Feeds

Microsoft yanks Windows code on GPL violation claim

Third time's the charm

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Microsoft has pulled a Windows 7 media and administration tool from the Microsoft Store site for apparently violating the GPL.

The company yanked ImageMaster after Within Windows blogger Rafael Rivera spotted the disc reading and burning tool was a CodePlex project licensed under GPLv2.

Microsoft appears to have violated the Free-Software Foundation's license in two ways: by modifying and then distributing the ImageMaster code without making its source-code available, and by actually bolting on its own, restricted licensing terms to the code.

A Microsoft spokesperson told The Reg: "We are currently looking into this issue and are taking down the Windows USB/DVD Tool (WUDT) from the Microsoft Store site until our review of this matter is complete."

This is not the first time Microsoft's landed in hot water for violating the GPL or for blurring the lines on CodePlex.

This summer, Microsoft apparently violated the GPL in Linux drivers for its Hyper-V code that it released under the GPL with a splash. The driver had been statically linked to binary parts, which was a problem because the GPL does not permit the mixing of closed and open-source elements.

Microsoft denied it had violated the GPL and released the drivers to remain in compliance.

Prior to that, a year ago, Microsoft was caught posting code to its CodePlex open-source project-hosting site under licenses that went against the principle of open-source.

The company posted projects under Microsoft licenses that stopped you from running CodePlex projects on non-Windows platforms or restrict access to code. CodePlex, though, was described by Microsoft as an open-source project community, meaning there should be no platform or code-access restrictions.

Microsoft never fully explained why this happened, but promised changes to add "clarity" around what projects are hosed on CodePlex. Since then, Microsoft announced the CodePlex Foundation that it said would help open source work with commercial software organizations. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
Linux Foundation says many Linux admins and engineers are certifiable
Floats exam program to help IT employers lock up talent
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?