Feeds

Sun's Facebook-slapping hits wrong target

Paedo-threat coverage risks more restrictions for all

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The task of policing this form of communication sits squarely with the UK’s Child Exploitation Online Protection Unit (CEOP). The Sun reported that Twitter have so far refused to host CEOP’s alert button – but Twitter are certainly not alone in this as our understanding is that to date no social networking sites have taken up this offer.

In respect of Twitter, The Sun’s expert, ex-cop Mark Williams-Thomas claimed: "The problem is nobody is policing Twitter and nobody has woken up to the fact it is being exploited by paedophiles.

"Twitter should be monitoring their pages to make sure this doesn't happen. But they are not."

However, it remains unclear how Twitter’s failure to join the IWF is relevant to this alleged problem. If users identify indecent images on site, they are free to report them to the IWF.

The IWF are keen to sign up new members – even where there is less scope for an individual company to take action against paedophiles using its services. A spokeswoman for the IWF said: "[we] can help organisations protect their networks and services from being abused, protect their customers from being exposed to criminal content, can act as a point of expertise, and facilitate liaison with law enforcement bodies and other key partners."

For this reason, Facebook and the IWF have been in talks about Facebook joining the IWF for some months – not, as the Sun implies, since their story last week – and Facebook’s membership application is due to come up at the IWF’s board in December.

A quick search of the Sun website highlights a long list of anti-Facebook stories. One active LibDem blogger last year did a comparison of positive Facebook and positive MySpace stories in The Sun. The result was 15 per cent for the former – and 93 per cent for the latter.

Stories this year include "Facebook killer boast teen jailed" and "'Kill message' on Facebook" – not to mention copious references to "Facebook Monster" and "Facebook perv" in reporting the recent case of child abuse carried out by a paedophile ring that had met up via Facebook. ®

Bootnote

The Sun and social networking site MySpace are both part of News Corp. Facebook is not.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine
Activists told NOT to snap pics of staff at the concrete doughnut
What do you mean, I have to POST a PHYSICAL CHEQUE to get my gun licence?
Stop bitching about firearms fees - we need computerisation
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?