Feeds

Booze shops get ID card lessons

More shops than cards

New hybrid storage solutions

Government workers have hit the streets of Manchester to promote the ID cards scheme to shop owners, who currently outnumber members of the public who have volunteered for a card.

The city is the first place in the country the public can apply for an ID card, which requires a fingerprinting session.

This week Identity and Passport Service (IPS) staff have been visiting alcohol retailers in the well-to-do suburb of Didsbury to teach them how to recognise the £30 cards.

Meg Hillier, the identity minister, said: "ID cards will be launching in Greater Manchester very soon, so a huge effort is underway to ensure businesses are ready.

"Voluntary identity cards will provide a secure and convenient gold standard identity document, and we're keen to make sure people are able to use them as smoothly as possible."

The Home Office said 3,000 shops will get a visit and "ID Smart" leaflets would be sent to 8,000 businesses.

The figures dwarf the number of ID card volunteers so far. At the last count in October just 2,000 had come forward in the area.

IPS bosses said they expected this to increase rapidly once the scheme is marketed to the public. A recent survey commissioned by the campaign group NO2ID, however, found public support for ID cards at its lowest yet.

John Axon, proprietor of the Didsbury delicatessen Cheese Hamlet said he'd been visited this week, but didn't believe he'd see many ID cards, even if more volunteers come forward.

"We sell about three cases of wine a year, mostly in hampers," he said.

Manchester's shops may also find their role as a test bed for ID cards short-lived. If the Conservatives win the next general election, which must be called before 4 June, they plan to scrap the scheme and the accompanying National Identity Register database. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC
And ISPs should nab 'em on our behalf
Former Bitcoin Foundation chair pleads guilty to money-laundering charge
Charlie Shrem plea deal could still get him five YEARS in chokey
NORKS ban Wi-Fi and satellite internet at embassies
Crackdown on tardy diplomatic sysadmins providing accidental unfiltered internet access
'Serious flaws in the Vertigan report' says broadband boffin
Report 'fails reality test' , is 'simply wrong' and offers ''convenient' justification for FTTN says Rod Tucker
FAIL.GOV – Government asks Dropbox for accounts that don't exist
Storage locker's transparency report shows rise in government data gobble attempts
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.