Feeds

Open University talks clouds with MS and Google

It's a learning process

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The Open University is in negotiations with Microsoft and Google about cloud computing services for students and staff.

Niall Sclater, the OU's director of learning innovation, told GC News that the university will shortly be taking a decision about whether to deploy Google Apps or Microsoft Live@edu.

He said that not only will the OU be able to outsource email services for its 229,000 students, as well as its staff, taking away the maintenance burden from the university, but it will also be able to use the large document storage facilities offered by cloud computing systems.

"In the longer term I can see more and more functionality accruing to cloud-based services," said Sclater. "We are watching very closely and having conversations with Microsoft and Google as we make our decision about which of those systems to go for."

In August Portsmouth University opened a Google Apps service to nearly 30,000 students and reported that within a month it had about 4,300 active users, including people from China, Nepal and Nigeria.

Sclater also said that, ahead of the UN Climate Change Conference in December, the OU is using web 2.0 techniques to engage with students and others about the issue.

Andrew Law, director of multi-platform broadcasting at the OU, said: "We are using Web 2 technology to invited people to put up questions, rate and comment on them. The top five that people most want asked will get a response from our best academics at Copenhagen.

"We are also inviting people to send us films that they have around climate change and we are using a Twitter feed to keep people up to date."

The university is also running a biodiversity project, iSpot, aimed at helping people identify natural species around them using a Web 2.0 environment.

This article was originally published at Kable.

Kable's GC weekly is a free email newsletter covering the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. To register click here.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone
News of the Weird: Screen-rotating technology declared unpatentable
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.