Feeds

Sacked drugs advisor pledges new expert body

Reckons more resignations are to come

Mobile application security vulnerability report

Professor David Nutt, sacked last week by Home Secretary Alan Johnson for disagreeing with government policy, is considering setting up a new drugs advisory body.

Quite how this would work, when the government seems unwilling to listen to the independent advice it is already being given, is not clear.

Nutt said the current Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs is hopelessly flawed and needs redesigning. Nutt and two other senior scientists resigned from the ACMD and others are expected to follow next week.

The remaining members of the council are meeting Johnson next Tuesday. If progress is not made, Nutt expects more resignations, according to the Beeb. The scientists are expected to ask Johnson for written guarantees on the council's future role.

The prof also said he had been offered funding to pay for an independent advisory body. The ACMD costs £150,000 a year to run.

The problem for the government is that the ACMD is required by the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. So the government may not need to listen to them but they do need to have them around.

In fact, as the Beeb notes, the ACMD is already in breach of its statute because its pharmacist, Marion Walker resigned after Nutt was sacked.

Nutt said that several projects had been put at risk by the departure of Les King from the ACMD, former head of drugs intelligence at the Forensic Science Service. These included work on artificial weed, sold under the brand Spice, research on polydrug use - which more closely reflects how drugs are used in the real world - and the effects of ketamine use on the bladder.

About the only people to have publicly supported Johnson's stance are the Tory Party.

Nutt said it was time Britain dealt with its real drug problem - booze. He told the BBC that if alcohol was created for the first time tomorrow it would quickly be outlawed. He said "The government has to wake up to this timebomb and the health risks of alcohol." ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
Adam Afriyie MP: Smart meters are NOT so smart
Mega-costly gas 'n' 'leccy totting-up tech not worth it - Tory MP
'Blow it up': Plods pop round for chat with Commonwealth Games tweeter
You'd better not be talking about the council's housing plans
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.