Feeds

Big Blue red-faced over Congestion charge crash

First day fumble of new systems

The Power of One Infographic

Things did not go entirely smoothly for IBM on its first day in control of Transport for London's Congestion Charge systems yesterday.

Capita set up the system and ran it for five years before TfL handed the contract to IBM in October 2007. Some staff were moved across and new systems put in place.

But sources told The Register on the morning of the first day that the system had not been live tested and staff were overrun with complaints.

A TfL spokeswoman said: “We apologise to customers for any problems they are experiencing since the transfer of systems to our new contractor this weekend. There have been some issues with accessing the online Congestion Charging payment accounts this morning, which the contractor is working to resolve as soon as possible.

"Customers should be assured that we are making arrangements so that no one will be penalised as a result of any problems today."

Error messages on the website warned people that there were "intermittent problems". But our insider complained that the transfer was not properly planned and problems were therefore inevitable. They said it was possible the system could send out penalty charge notices incorrectly because either people could not pay or the system would fail to record payments.

But TfL, which admitted there had been a high volume of calls to its help and payment lines, insisted that any teething problems would be fixed within 48 hours.

People needing to pay the congestion charge were advised not to use their existing registered accounts but should instead pay without registering. You can also pay via the call centre, or local shop, until midnight tomorrow without getting fined.

If any Register readers had problems with the system yesterday, please let us know via comments, or email me directly by clicking on the byline at the top of this story. ®

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

More from The Register

next story
Sit back down, Julian Assange™, you're not going anywhere just yet
Swedish court refuses to withdraw arrest warrant
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Delaware pair nabbed for getting saucy atop Mexican eatery
Burrito meets soft taco in alleged rooftop romp outrage
British cops cuff 660 suspected paedophiles
Arrests people allegedly accessing child abuse images online
LightSquared backer sues FCC over spectrum shindy
Why, we might as well have been buying AIR
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.