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Aspiring model pleasures Taoist master

Actually administers ritual BJ to truck driver, HK court hears

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A Hong Kong model, whose career was evidently not going too well, was told by her agent that he happened to know a Taoist Mao Shan master with the power to grant her success - providing she had ritual sex with him.

Unfortunately, the guru in question was actually 55-year-old truck driver Au Yeung Kwok-fu, and the unnamed 19-year-old succeeded only in getting pregnant during nine encounters involving oral sex and intercourse.

According to the South China Morning Post, the teenager's agency boss "brought up the topic of changing her luck during a phone conversation" in April 2007, and suggested she meet the master for an intimate consultation

She explained: "Because we belonged to the entertainment business, the ritual involved oral sex, sexual intercourse and burning incense. This was a sort of Mao Shan style."

The first ritual took place shortly after at a house in North Point, where Au Yeung "asked the model to follow him into a room, where he asked her to remove her clothes". With the agent and a friend also on hand to monitor proceedings, Au Yeung "then used fu - written talismans - to mark her body".

Au Yeung then got his kit off, requested oral sex, and had full sex with the model during the fifteen-minute rendezvous. She noted that the master had rather generously not asked for payment for his services, but she gave him HK$200 for his trouble anyway.

She later became worried about the possibility of getting in the family way, and rang Au Yeung, who assured her he "had the supernatural power to keep me from getting pregnant".

He didn't, and eight further rituals resulted in the poor girl up the duff and Au Yeung hauled before the beak this week on nine counts of "procuring unlawful sexual acts by false pretences".

The defendant pleaded not guilty to the charges, but since his victim aborted the pregnancy and DNA tests linked the foetus back to its father, it's likely that his days as a Mao Shan practitioner are at an end.

The aspiring clotheshorse told the court she'd "never suspected the credibility of the ceremony", and admitted: "I believed he could help me change the luck in my career." ®

Bootnote

Thanks to Vijay Jairaj for the tip-off.

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