Feeds
70%
Nokia 6303 Classic

Nokia 6303 Classic

A no-frills phone just for talking on? Surely not?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The Power of One Infographic

Review While Nokia continues to push at the boundaries of mobile phone technology, it also has its eye on the voice-as-primary-function mainstream. This is where its bread and butter lies, and a market well served by the stalwart and very popular 6300. Now meet its successor, the 6303 Classic.

Nokia 6303 Classic

Nokia's 6303 Classic: the candybar handset that wants to be a slider

As such, it's a handset with few frills. There’s no GPS, no Wi-Fi and no 3G. Actually, 3G is one absence that that may hold this handset back. What constitutes the mid-range is moot, but for our money 3G is one feature that's fast becoming, if it isn't already, a must have for all but the most bottom-of-the-ladder phones.

Incidentally, if you want 3G - and also GPS and a better camera - then maybe the £200-plus 6700 Classic might be more up your street.

Back to the 6303 Classic and it's a candybar handset with a very teensy twist. The size and weight are well within acceptable parameters - 108.8 x 46.2 x 11.7mm and 96g - but what's unusual here is the way the screen and shortcut buttons are enclosed in a frame which is curved and raised up from the number pad.

As you can see from the pictures, it makes it look like an open sliderphone. It doesn't slide but it is distinctive, and fortunately doesn't impede how you use the phone. The number keys have been squeezed a bit to make room for the relatively large rocker keys either side of the navpad. These combine Call and End with the soft-menu buttons.

However, the number keys themselves are well separated from each other and are tactile. The bottom row is close to the edge of the handset, though, and the outer keys are almost half the size of the other buttons because of the curve of the handset's base.

Nokia 6303 Classic

The number keys aren't bad, but the bottom row keys can be tricky to tap

The build quality is good for a phone at this price point. There's enough metal in the chassis to make the handset feel substantial and to allow it to take a few knocks and drops.

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
NEW Raspberry Pi B+, NOW with - count them - FOUR USB ports
Composite vid socket binned as GPIO sprouts new pins
Child diagnosed as allergic to iPad
Apple's fondleslab is the tablet dermatitis sufferers won't want to take
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
Seventh-gen SPARC silicon will accelerate Oracle databases
Uncle Larry's mutually-optimised stack to become clearer in August
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.