Feeds

Google sued for super-skinny Chrome polishing

I have a patent on your Courgette

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Mobilephoneware maker Red Bend Software has sued Google for patent infringement, claiming that the web giant's Chrome browser steps on an algorithmic patent it secured in 2003.

In tandem with its Israeli parent company - Red Bend Ltd. - the Massachusetts-based Red Bend Software filed its suit in federal court on Monday, accusing Google of infringing its patent on "a method for generating a compact difference result between an old program and a new program."

Red Bend uses this "differential compression algorithm" to rapidly push firmware updates onto mobile phones. Basically, the technology updates pieces of a remote software package without updating the whole thing.

Google's Chrome browser uses an update compression algorithm called "Courgette," and Red Bend contends that with this Zucchini algorithm, Google is willfully infringing on its patent. That willful bit means that Red Bend is seeking treble the damages. The company says that Google has known about the patent since early September. Presumably, that's when Red Bend sent the web giant a letter.

Since Google has open-sourced the Courgette code, Red Bend also says that its doing so induces infringement from others.

Google Chrome is based on the Google-created Chromium open-source browser project. Documentation on the Chromium site describes Courgette as a new differential compression algorithm - written by Google - for making Google Chrome updates "significantly smaller."

"We want smaller updates because it narrows the window of vulnerability. If the update is a tenth of the size, we can push ten times as many per unit of bandwidth," the site says. "We have enough users that this means more users will be protected earlier. A secondary benefit is that a smaller update will work better for users who don't have great connectivity.

"Rather than push put a whole new 10MB update, we send out a diff that takes the previous version of Google Chrome and generates the new version."

Red Bend didn't immediately respond to our request for comment. And Google declined to comment. "We haven't yet been served, so we can't comment until we've had a chance to review the complaint," a spokesman said.

You can see Red Bend's differential compression patent here (US Patent 6,546,552). ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
Admins! Never mind POODLE, there're NEW OpenSSL bugs to splat
Four new patches for open-source crypto libraries
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.