Feeds

BlackBerry Storm 2 launch continues

Verizon to follow Vodafone's recent UK launch

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The BlackBerry Storm 2 will be available in North America just two days after the handset hits Blighty.

Vodafone released RIM’s second attempt at the Storm smartphone into the UK yesterday, and US carrier Verizon subsequently announced that it will release the Storm 2 Stateside on 28 October – that’s tomorrow, folks.

In the UK, Vodafone will give the Storm 2 – aka the BlackBerry 9520 – away for free on contracts costing at least £35 ($57/€38) per month.

Verizon, on the other hand, has priced the smartphone up at $180 (£110/€121). The price includes a $100 mail-in rebate and you’ll have to sign a two-year contract worth at least $30 per month, Verizon added.

The major difference – or should we say advantage? – between the original and the latest Storm is that while the first-generation Storm, released in the UK during November 2008, didn’t support Wi-Fi – the Storm 2 supports 802.11b/g.

Although the Storm 2 features the same 3.2in, 360 x 480 display and 3.2Mp camera as the 9500, the new version’s touchscreen supposedly has a ‘spongy’ feel to it. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Whitepapers

Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.