Clock stopped for McKinnon extradition

Glimmer of hope for alien-seeking hacker

Home Secretary Alan Johnson has confirmed to the House of Commons that he has "stopped the clock" on Gary McKinnon's extradition while new medical evidence is considered.

Answering a question from McKinnon's MP David Burrowes, Johnson said: "we have stopped the clock ticking in regard to the representation to the European Court because new medical evidence has been provided."

Johnson said there were two separate issues: firstly McKinnon's desire to be prosecuted in the UK, which was dismissed by the High Court in July. Secondly, McKinnon's human rights - it is on this basis that Johnson will look again at medical evidence. McKinnon suffers from Asperger's Syndrome, a form of autism.

Burrowes, McKinnon's constituency MP, further asked the Home Secretary to delay the execution of the extradition order until after the matter was considered by the Home Affairs Select Committee which meets on 10 November.

McKinnon is wanted in the US on hacking charges. He is accused of hacking into military computers, but he claims he was only looking for evidence of alien energy technology and only accessed unprotected systems. ®

Sponsored: 10 ways wire data helps conquer IT complexity