Feeds

Gizmodo says sorry for malware suckerpunch

Staff on Macs late to spot hack

The essential guide to IT transformation

Tech blog Gizmodo has been suckerpunched by cyber scoundrels, who placed malware-loaded web ads on the site.

Gizmodo is the latest online publication to have been targeted by villainous hackers. The site coughed to the nasty scam and issued an apology today.

“Guys, I'm really sorry but we had some malware running on our site in ad boxes for a little while last week on Suzuki ads,” wrote Gizmodo’s Brian Lam. “They somehow fooled our ad sales team through an elaborate scam. It's taken care of now, and only a few people should have been affected, but this isn't something we take lightly as writers, editors and tech geeks.”

Lam added that staffers at Gizmodo, which is owned by Gawker Media, might’ve spotted the malware sooner but for the fact that everyone uses Mac OS X or Linux machines.

“Everything should be cleared up but you should be checking ‘qegasysguard.exe’ if you're experiencing random popups,” he said. “Be careful, load up some antivirus and make sure your system is clean. I'm sorry.”

A similar scam fooled the New York Times into hosting malware on its homepage in September this year.

Just yesterday, The Guardian newspaper’s jobs website warned 500,000 users that hackers may have got hold of private information held on the site after a "sophisticated and deliberate" attack.

Anti-virus powerhouse Sophos was quick to issue a statement about the latest high-profile hack to strike, er, hacks.

"By hitting one of the biggest blogs in the world, these hackers are aiming high," said Sophos tech guru Graham Cluley. "Their plan was to infect as many computer users as possible with their malicious adverts.

"They know Gizmodo gets a huge amount of traffic - once they infected the site through their adverts they could just lie in wait for their victims to visit.

“What is particularly audacious about this plot is that the criminals appear to have posed as legitimate representatives of Suzuki in order to plant their dangerous code on Gizmodo's popular website." ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Ice cream headache as black hat hacks sack Dairy Queen
I scream, you scream, we all scream 'DATA BREACH'!
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
New Snowden leak: How NSA shared 850-billion-plus metadata records
'Federated search' spaffed info all over Five Eyes chums
Three quarters of South Korea popped in online gaming raids
Records used to plunder game items, sold off to low lifes
Oz fed police in PDF redaction SNAFU
Give us your metadata, we'll publish your data
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?