Feeds

Dell chief stuffs data center into suitcase

Ripped and replaced

High performance access to file storage

Sun Microsystems took data centers mobile when it embraced shipping containers, but Dell's gone further - and smaller - with a data center in a briefcase.

Self-outed Dell geek Jimmy Pike has built a data-center in a briefcase, hacking together a dual-socket server cluster featuring a pair of 2.5GHz Intel processors and a combined 32Gb memory and 4Tb storage on two machines running Windows Server 2003 and Red hat Enterprise Linux.

Pike happens to be the director of systems architecture for Dell's data center solutions group, and he likes to take his work - meaning servers - home.

Dell's director, a veteran of NCR and Intel, said he just started hacking things together in his garage one Saturday afternoon.

"I decided it could be a cool thing to build a couple of servers in a brief case. That way, when I bring things back and forth from home to work, it wouldn't be so much trouble," he told Dell cloud computing evangelist Barton George during a video posted here and below.

"I wondered if I could cram everything I wanted into this briefcase."

Turns out he could. "I call it a portable for the architect on the go," Pike said.

What exactly is in Pike's portable? Two 16Gb servers running a pair of L5420 Xeon 2.5 processors - previously known as Harpertown - and sporting a pair of one-terabyte, 3.5 SATA devices. There's a five-port Ethernet switch and everything's running off one of Dell's single, central power supply units.

Pike's also thrown in two 500Gb scratch discs for testing and a pair of Solid-State Drives because he's "constantly running into questions about SSDs and how they behave." And yes, there's cooling with six fans.

The only thing not included is virtualization, so the two machines are running their copies of Windows 2003 and RHEL separately. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Seagate brings out 6TB HDD, did not need NO STEENKIN' SHINGLES
Or helium filling either, according to reports
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.