Feeds

Crypto spares man who secretly video taped flatmates

Police can't crack code

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

An Australian man who set up an elaborate network of hidden cameras to spy on his flatmates has escaped jail time after police were unable to crack the encryption scheme protecting his computer.

When police raided the residence of Rohan James Wyllie, they found found a series of peepholes drilled into the walls and doors of rooms occupied by his two female and one male flatmates. Wires led to Wyllie's bedroom, and the names of files on his computer were consistent with video footage that would have been recorded onto the hard drive of his computer.

But the files were encrypted, and the 39-year-old Wyllie refused to divulge the password. The inability of police to review the files - combined with the fact that a camera he used was unplugged when the raid was commenced - meant prosecutors lacked the hard evidence they needed to prove the man had secretly taped his flatmates.

Wyllie eventually pleaded guilty in Southport District Court to one count of attempting to visually record a person without consent in a private place. His lawyer said his client suffered from paranoid schizophrenia and believed his mates were conspiring against him.

Given the lack of evidence and the 33 days Wyllie already spent in jail, the judge hearing the case accepted the guilty plea. He sentenced the man to two years of probation.

The legal status of encryption passwords remains unresolved in many parts of the world. There were no press reports suggesting prosecutors in Australia had the authority to compel Wyllie to reveal his code. But a US judge in Vermont earlier this year ordered a child porn suspect to decrypt his hard drive so investigators could inspect its contents.

More coverage is here and here. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
NUDE SNAPS AGENCY: NSA bods love 'showing off your saucy selfies'
Swapping other people's sexts is a fringe benefit, says Snowden
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
British data cops: We need greater powers and more money
You want data butt kicking, we need bigger boots - ICO
Crooks fling banking Trojan at Japanese smut site fans
Wait - they're doing online banking with an unpatched Windows PC?
NIST told to grow a pair and kick NSA to the curb
Lrn2crypto, oversight panel tells US govt's algorithm bods
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.