Feeds

Bond's Dr. No dies at 91

Farewell, Wiseman

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

Joseph Wiseman, the stage and screen actor who played the title role in "Dr. No," the first James Bond film, has died at the age of 91.

Speaking with The New York Times, his daughter, Martha Graham Wiseman, said her father had recently been in declining health.

Based on the Ian Fleming novel of the same name, "Dr. No" premiered at the London Pavilion in October 1962, the first entry in what would become a nearly 50-year Bond franchise. The 22nd film in the official series, "Quantum of Solace," starring Daniel Craig as 007, was released last year, and a 23rd is on the way.

"Dr. No" starred Sean Connery as Bond, with Wiseman filing the role of Bond's larger-than-life antagonist, a self-described "unwanted child of a German missionary and a Chinese girl of a good family [who] became treasurer of the most powerful criminal society in China" and lost both hands in a radiation accident.

"I'm a member of SPECTRE," Wiseman said as Dr. Julius No. "Special Executive for Counter Intelligence, Terrorism, Revenge, Extortion. The four great cornerstones of power headed by the greatest brains in the world."

"Correction," Connery's Bond replied. "Criminal brains."

"The successful criminal brain is always superior," said No. "It has to be."

Wiseman's other film credits include such familiar titles as "Detective Story" (1951), "Viva Zapata!" (1952), "The Silver Chalice" (1954), "The Unforgiven” (1960), "The Night They Raided Minsky’s" (1968), and "The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz" (1974). And his list of television credits includes guest spots in everything from the original Rod Serling "Twilight Zone" to "LA Law" to, most recently, "Law & Order."

He was also a stage actor, appearing most recently on Broadway in the 2001 adaptation of the film "Judgment at Nuremberg." Other Broadway credits include "Abe Lincoln in Illinois"(1938), "Antony and Cleopatra" (1947), "The Lark” (1955)," and "In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer" (1969), in which he played the title role.

But most will remember him for another title role. ®

Seven Steps to Software Security

More from The Register

next story
NSA man: 'Tell me about your Turkish connections'
Spooks ask Dabbsy to suggest a nice hotel with pool
Russia sends SEX-CRAZED GECKOS to SPAAAAACE!
In space... no one can hear you're green...
Carlos: Slim your working week to just three days of toil
'Midas World' vision suggests you retire later, watch more tellie and buy more stuff
Yahoo! Japan! launches! service! for! the! dead!
If you're reading this email, I am no longer alive
Plucky Rockall podule man back on (proper) dry land
Bold, barmy Brit adventurer Nick Hancock escapes North Atlantic islet
Motorist 'thought car had caught fire' as Adele track came on stereo
'FIRE' caption on dashboard prompts dunderheaded hard shoulder halt
OKCupid: OK, STUPID, yes we set you up with BAD DATES on purpose
Tests show 'myth of compatibilty as good as truth'
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.