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Toilet texting not a faux pas, declares Intel

40% think it's OK to use a mobile device on a date

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Intel has published a helpful guide to mobile use during the holidays, ruling that Americans believe it's rude to surf the web at the dinner table, but OK to slip off to the john for a swift Google.

The chip giant commissioned research firm Harris Interactive to define the unwritten rules of mobile etiquette, just as Americans gear up to spend time with their families over Thanksgiving and Christmas/Hannuka/Kwanza.

Apparently 80 per cent of Yanks feel there are "unwritten rules of etiquette", with 69 per cent agreeing that checking emails, sending text messages and making calls while in company is a no-no.

Religious services are a definite no go for mobile technology, with 87 per cent agreeing churches and other such sacred spaces are no place for mobiles. Airport security lines are a different matter, with 64 per cent unlikely to be offended by someone yakking as they're having their intimates searched.

Talking of intimates, 60 per cent of adults would be offended by someone using a mobile device on a date. The type of mobile device in question is not detailed.

At least 52 per cent would be actively offended if someone attempted "to secretly use an Internet-enabled device, such as a laptop, netbook or cell phone, at the table". By contrast, "despite hygiene considerations and potentially awkward explanations, 75 percent feel it is perfectly appropriate to use Internet-enabled devices, including laptops, netbooks and cell phones, in the bathroom".

Of course, being texted from the toilet is possibly more hygienic than receiving a letter written from the lav. And Intel documents the decline of letter-writing in favour of texts and email. Almost two thirds of adults would send an e-card or email instead of a traditional card, and 88 per cent would not be offended to received a Thank You card by email.

Got your own views on what to with that netbook while stuffing your face with Turkey? Let us know below.®

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