Feeds

SCO boots boss McBride

Linux lawsuits live

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Unix code claimant SCO Group has jettisoned its controversial captain, Darl McBride, as part of the company's latest scheme to emerge from bankruptcy.

The serially litigious SCO's executive ousting was revealed in a filing today with US regulators, although corresponding paperwork gives McBride's actual dismissal date as October 14. The decision to remove McBride was done under the auspices of the Chapter 11 bankruptcy trustee assigned to SCO by the US Justice Department. That leaves COO, Jeff Hunsaker, CFO, Ken Nielsen, and General Counsel, Ryan Tibbitts grappling for the helm.

According to the filings with the US Securities and Exchange Commission, SCO's remaining management will still continue to push forward with its long-running intellectual property lawsuits against IBM and Novell. It also stated the company expects to finalize details of the restructuring and to reach cash flow break-even for core operations within the next month.

McBride was the architect and voice behind SCO's troublesome legal crusade against Linux. It began when Novell sold Unix trademarks and other assets to SCO — and the company assumed the deal included copyrights to Unix code. In 2003, SCO sued IBM for handing over the allegedly copyrighted technology to the Linux kernel and ultimately demanded that just about any company using Linux must purchase an IP license.

A year later, SCO filed a slander of action lawsuit against Novell after the company said it still actually owned the disputed Unix copyrights in SCO's case against IBM. Although US courts have found (twice) that the copyrights do in fact belong to Novell, in August an appeals court determined a jury trial is needed to sort through the mess rather than leaving it to a single judge.

SCO has since become a bankrupt shell of its former self, desperately attempting to unload some of its non-core assets to fund its court battles against IBM and Novell. Revival, at this point, seems extremely unlikely. The company bet the farm on lawsuits and, failing to have any other means of revenue, must now accept the leash of US government regulators if it doesn't want to be put down for good. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Next Windows obsolescence panic is 450 days from … NOW!
The clock is ticking louder for Windows Server 2003 R2 users
Ditch the sync, paddle in the Streem: Upstart offers syncless sharing
Upload, delete and carry on sharing afterwards?
Microsoft TIER SMEAR changes app prices whether devs ask or not
Some go up, some go down, Redmond goes silent
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.