Feeds

IBM shows flash of SVC inspiration

Dumps Fusion-io for STEC

High performance access to file storage

IBM has upgraded its SAN Volume Controller to use Nehalem (Xeon 5500) processors and STEC solid state drives, rather than the Fusion-io cards that were demonstrated in the million IOPS QUicksilver project.

The SAN Volume Controller (SVC) is located in a storage area network (SAN) fabric and virtualises IBM and certain third-party storage arrays attached to the fabric, providing a thinly-provisioned single pool of storage.

SVC version 5.0 adds both 8Gbit/s Fibre Channel and iSCSI support, opening the way for later Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE). Cache per engine triples to 24GB. There can be from one to four SSDs.

Barry White, an IBM Master inventor at Hursley in the UK, blogged about this: "What may surprise some is that this isn't done using the FusionIo ioDrive cards that we used in Quicksilver, but with STEC's... 2.5 inch SAS ZeusIOPs drives."

Why choose STEC ones?

"There were various reasons for switching ... a hot pluggable drive is much easier to service than an internal PCIe adapter (when it comes to a 24x7 enterprise storage system anyway). The STEC drives also offload all of the 'Flash Management' required by enterprise-class SSD's (the garbage collection of old no-longer active copies, the wear levelling, the collation of writes, etc.) into the device itself. With the ioDrive we were consuming at least 2GB of system memory and an entire core on the nodes, just to run their kernel mode equivalent functions."

"The other main reason to switch between an ioDrive and ZeusIOPs device was form factor... space is at a premium and so we only have two available PCIe slots. This would only allow one PCIe-based SSD, verses the multiple 2.5 inch drive bays."

The SSDs are connected via a high-performance SAS HBA developed by IBM. The overall result is that SVC v5.0 runs up to 800,000 IOPS with a 1ms latency, twice the existing SVC node throughput.

SAN Volume Controller 5.0 will be available on November 6, with a US starting list price of $40,000. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Seagate brings out 6TB HDD, did not need NO STEENKIN' SHINGLES
Or helium filling either, according to reports
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.