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Brother DCP375CW

Brother DCP-375CW wireless multifunction inkjet printer

Compact and stylish MFD photo printer, anyone?

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You can also use the slot as a straightforward card adapter for downloading photos to your computer using the software provided. One especially smart feature allows you to save your scans directly to a camera card in JPG or PDF formats with pixel resolution of up to 600dpi.

Brother DCP375CW

No PictBridge support but Wi-Fi included as standard

The paper input cassette is accessed from the front with the output tray on top. The input cassette holds just 100 sheets but is designed flush with the rest of the case. The output tray holds 50 sheets and extends forwards to keep the printouts flat while they dry.

Each of the black, cyan, magenta and yellow inks are sold in separate cartridges, and these slot behind a door at the front, just to the right of the paper trays. Although it is supposed to be efficient to keep the inks separate, each cartridge is quite small: the colour inks are rated good for just 260 sides of A4 business documents, while the slightly larger black cartridge can run to 300 sides.

At the lowest possible prices currently being offered, and ignoring the cost of the paper, this means each four-colour A4 printout will cost about 8p. Remember, this is for documents with only 5% ink coverage. As soon as you start printing photos, the per-item cost is going to rocket. The cheapest way to buy the inks is as a set of four (costing £41.39), which makes you wonder why they are supplied in separate cartridges at all.

USB and 10/100BaseTx Ethernet ports are incorporated inside the machine rather than at the rear. The DCP-375CW is also a wireless device but setting up the Wi-Fi connection is very fiddly due to the tiny LCD status window and the lack of a numeric keypad to configure the network addresses.

Brother DCP375CW

The inks are loaded as four separate cartridges into slots hidden conveniently behind a door at the front

In use, the DCP-375CW produced some beautiful photo prints on a variety of stock. Its 1200x2400dpi high-resolution, borderless output onto glossy 6x4 photo cards was especially impressive and full of detail. However, the hi-res output was extremely slow, with large photo images being printed to A4 occasionally dropping the Wi-Fi connection before completion.

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Next page: Verdict

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