Feeds
70%
Samsung C6625

Samsung GT-C6625

Basic business wannabee?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

At least you can partake of navigation with the built in GPS. Google Maps has been pre-installed, so you can make a start with location-based services. You can add third party applications for full point-to-point navigation. With 100MB of user memory built in and a side-mounted slot for an SD card, memory should not be an issue. Vodafone’s Web site says cards to 8GB are supported, but we tried a 16BG microSD card and it was recognised.

Samsung C6625

Not the slimmest, but acceptable for a smartphone

The GT-C6625 weighs 109g, which is well within acceptable parameters for a smartphone. It looks a little on the chunky side but at 113 x 63 x 11.95mm it compares well, for example, to HTC's Snap at 117 x 62 x 12mm yet, thanks to its design, the Snap actually looks smaller and neater.

On the GT-C6625, the buttons under the screen are sizeable and comprise of two blocky Call and End keys, a large retro looking navigation button and flat, shiny softmenu, Home and Clear keys. The Qwerty keyboard is well put together and easy to use.

Individual keys are fairly large and, importantly, they are well spaced and raised from their surroundings. This tends to make for ease of use, and does so here. The keys depress a good long way and give a satisfying click, which are two more characteristics of a good keyboard.

On the keyboard’s bottom row are dedicated shortcut keys to the Windows Media Player software, Messaging, Internet Explorer, and the built in camera. With a long press on the space bar you can mute the handset.

Samsung C6625

Just a 2Mp camera – and that's a mirror, not a flash, next to the lens

Having mentioned the camera, let’s give it a bit of airplay. It shoots stills at 2Mp, video is limited to 320 x 240 and 176 x 144 resolutions. The camera is quite short on features, though Samsung shows a bit of a split personality – as it often does with its business focused handsets – by offering among its options, a funny mask mode which variously overlays things like headphones, rabbit ears, tears and glasses onto photos. Smile detection is here too, but there is no flash.

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Bose says today is F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle
Music gear giant seeks some of that sweet, sweet Apple pie
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Microsoft confirms secret Surface will never see the light of day
Microsoft's form 8-K records decision 'not to ship a new form factor'
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.