Feeds

Mitsubishi preps 'versatile' plug-in hybrid e-car

4WD or 2WD; battery, petrol or both - PX-MiEV drive train will do it all

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Leccy Tech Mitsubishi has announced details of the range-extended plug-in hybrid that Reg Hardware first got a sniff of back in July and which will be officially unveiled at the Tokyo Motor Show next week .

Called the PX-MiEV, the concept vehicle promises to have one of the most versatile hybrid drive trains yet developed.

Mitsubishi PX-MiEV

Mitsubishi's PX-MiEV: works as a hybrid, works as a pure EV

At low speeds, power will be fed to the front wheels by an electric motor. When things get a bit slippery, a second electric motor will provide power to the rear wheels.

At medium speeds, or when the lithium-ion battery pack begins to run low on charge, a 1.6l four-cylinder petrol engine will fire up to drive a generator that will power the electric motors and re-charge the battery.

At higher speeds, the vehicle will run in front-wheel drive mode with power coming directly from the petrol engine. The battery pack will provide extra performance or drive the rear wheels as needed.

All that means the PX-MiEV can operate as a pure EV as well as both a parallel and a series hybrid.

Mitsubishi PX-MiEV

Charge the battery here - or tap it if you need juice while you're out and about

Combined, the two electric motors have a maximum power output of 60kW (80.5bhp) and produce 200Nm (148lb ft) of torque.

No details of the battery capacity were released, but Mitsubishi said that with a full charge the vehicle should be able to travel around 31m (50km).

The petrol engine produces 85kW (114bhp) and 125Nm (92lb ft) while the attached generator has a maximum output of 70kW.

In the event of PX-MiEV users finding themselves up the creek without a paddle, the vehicle's domestic charge plug doubles up as a power socket, allowing the battery and/or engine to be used as a power source.

A 100V AC auxiliary socket in the boot allows for less crisis-related access to the power stored in the battery.

Mitsubishi PX-MiEV

Concept for now, but will be a product very soon

Like the iMiEV, the PX has two charge sockets, one for a domestic charger and one for high-power quick charge.

Though the PX-MiEV is billed as a concept something very, very similar will be available to buy from your local Mitsubishi dealer in the next 18 months. ®

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
PORTAL TO ELSEWHERE scried in small galaxy far, far away
Supermassive black hole dominates titchy star formation
Bacon-related medical breakthrough wins Ig Nobel prize
Is there ANYTHING cured pork can't do?
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.