Feeds

Proles told to get online to save economy

Or we'll ruin EastEnders

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Having recently been given her very own digi-quango, dotcom ingenue Martha Lane-Fox has taken to airwaves and newspapers to berate the public for not using the internet enough.

The web-travel-agent-turned-biznovation-wonk is appalled there are ten million Brits who have never used the internet, according to her staff's research. She wants to nudge the poorest four million online by 2012.

Lane-Fox - once voted "Britain's most overrated businessperson" - was appointed Gordon Brown's "Digital Champion" earlier this year, with her own "Digital Inclusion Task Force". She quickly concluded that anybody who doesn't use the internet will soon be a non-person.

Today she added some topspin to the attack, claiming that enormous economic benefits would be had by all if refuseniks would just fall into line. A report she commissioned from PricewaterhouseCoopers estimates at least £22.6bn would be generated in the economy by her brand of digital social engineering.

Part of Lane-Fox's policy solution to this shocking state of affairs is to press ITV and the BBC to include web evangelist propaganda in soap operas (that's how the proles spend their time, right?).

"I've been lobbying both the BBC and ITV to say one of the most dramatic things that I think we could do would be to have a proper storyline about technology in public consciousness. I'd love a storyline in EastEnders or Coronation Street," she said in an exclusive interview with The Guardian*.

Apparently, "the jury is still out" on whether an exciting plot involving Peggy Mitchell's problems obtaining a broadband MAC promptly will appear.

But why stop there, Martha? How about a Digital Inclusion week on X Factor, with the fame-hungry contestants mentored by Clive Sinclair and forced to perform Kraftwerk songs (that actually might be quite good). Meanwhile the Beeb could dose up Brucie for an online round of Dance Dance Revolution on Strictly.

Lane-Fox's other measure to address the perceived problem that some people have never used the internet is, er, a website. It's here, or rather it's "coming soon". ®

*Also exclusively given to the BBC. And The Telegraph. And Brand Republic.

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.