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Firefox 3.5.4 beta ready for bug testing, abuse

SeaMonkey 2.0 RC1 swims onto web

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While Firefox testers can expect getting their mitts around the first public beta of Firefox 3.6 tomorrow, Mozilla still has the less-glamorous task of putting the browser's next security and stability update through some serious abuse.

On Monday, Mozilla trotted out Firefox 3.5.4 release candidate for testing on the non-profit's FTP servers. Venture here for the various OS flavors.

"Please hammer on these builds mercilessly to make sure that things work well! If you notice things that worked in previous Firefox 3.5.3 and does not work in this release, we would like to know about it *right away*," wrote Carsten Book, a software engineer working for the Mozilla QA Team.

Firefox 3.5.4 is mostly a maintenance exercise, lacking the reported performance gains that may entice folks to play around with version 3.6 when it hits. Never the less, the 3.5.4 release candidate is here now, ready to close its eyes and think of England.

Mozilla plans to have a final version of Firefox 3.5.4 next week, on October 21. That puts the code a day ahead of the official release of Windows 7.

Mozilla also pumped out this weekend its first release candidate of version 2.0 of SeaMonkey, the foundation's "all-in-one internet application suite."

SeaMonkey is the spiritual successor to the Netscape Communicator of olden days, when things like newsgroup support, email, an IRC client, and HTML editing were all baked into the browser. Thus, we see that time and space are circular.

"If we would release this RC as final, the release would be roughly a week after it," wrote Robert Kaiser, SeaMonkey project coordinator. "I expect that we'll have a second RC though with a number of assorted fixes, and I hope that one can become the actual final around October 21."

Downloads for SeaMonkey 2.0 RC1 are available here. Release notes are located yonder. ®

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