Feeds

Oracle to 'out-Sun' Sun on hardware and software

Lovin' MySQL to pieces

The essential guide to IT transformation

OpenWorld 09 Oracle will out-invest Sun Microsystems on Sparc and Solaris and provide more open source contributions, Larry Ellison and Scott McNealy told OpenWorld Sunday night.

Oracle's chief executive and Sun's chairman, joined by executive vice president of systems John Fowler, also made the pitch that Oracle customers should run more of their applications and middleware on Sparc and Solaris.

Java father James Gosling, meanwhile, stepped in to reassure the Java community Oracle has a vested interest in maintaining and developing Java.

Scott McNealy

McNealy: sells Oracle users on Sparc and Solaris

Just one thing threw out their OpenWorld opening pitch - MySQL. Specifically, the European Union's investigation of Oracle's proposed purchase of Sun, given Oracle's ownership of nearly fifty per cent of the RDBMS market, and concerns among the open-source community over MySQL's future under the closed-source giant.

Ellison and McNealy pointed to Oracle's track record in buying and continuing open-source projects - notably the MySQL transaction engine InnoDB and the Sleepycat database. Also, McNealy claimed if Oracle messed with MySQL, the community would simply fork because the project is licensed under the GPL

According to both execs, though, the deal will close - and Oracle will get Sun. McNealy told OpenWorld: "I'm not quite sure why it's being held up but we are working with the authorities," he said.

Ellison followed up: "We are going to increase Sun's investment in MySQL if this merger goes through - and we think it will. It's a fascinating piece of technology, it's extremely popular, it's an open-source product and we are going to increase our rate of invest to that product."

Echoing McNealy, Ellison said: "When we bought InnoDB people speculated they would kill InnoBD. We bought InnoBD to make it better and make some money along the way. That's how we feel about MySQL."

Away from MySQL, McNealy promised Oracle will spend more money on development of Sparc and Solaris than Sun, and McNealy highlighted a recent Ellison quote in The Reg speaking of Oracle's belief in Java - or: "Java speaks for itself". A tip of the hat to McNealy, incidentally, for flagging up The Reg at this premier Oracle event, given its policy of not commenting in any of our articles about Oracle and its acquisition of Sun.

Gosling also said that Oracle is committed because of its own product mix. Only, he noted, Oracle has been caught out by the sheer scale of taking on Sun's developer engagement, noting there are 15 million downloads of the Java Runtime Environment on an average week.

Larry Ellison

Ellison: like InnoDB, we will make some money from MySQL

"They've been a little unprepared for the volume of the Java world when we talk to them about developer programs," Gosling said. "Oracle has a developer program. We have a developer program. When you look at the size of ours it has a couple of extra digits."

Re-assurances aside, and as The Reg reported earlier, OpenWorld turned into an attempt to convince Oracle's database, middleware and business applications customers to put their software on Sparc and Solaris. McNealy said around a third of delegates are using Sun's software and hardware stack. "The other two thirds", McNealy said "we didn't lose your business, we just postponed your business."

McNealy was then joined by Fowler to outline features in Solaris for Oracle applications. This included built-in cryptography, advanced memory for large-scale Java applications, fault management, and dynamic configuration. Fowler claimed Sun is now number-one in performance benchmarks for transaction processing, business intelligence, analytics and application server.

Ellison, meanwhile, used the remainder of the event to beat up on IBM in high-performance data systems, in an expected pitch for Exadata V2. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.