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Microsoft and Armani fashion a phone

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It's a marriage made in heaven: Microsoft and Giorgio Armani, with a little help from Samsung, have launched a mobile phone.

The Armani phone runs Microsoft's Windows Mobile 6.5, and if you're wearing a baggy Armani suit, you might even have room in your pocket for it. The latest, and least bad, version of Windows Mobile launched earlier this month. The company is hoping its applications store will create some of the buzz which surrounds iPhone apps.

The chunky phone, complete with "bronze detailing", has a full Qwerty keyboard, touch-sensitive screen and 5Mp camera.

It was launched by Steve Ballmer and Giorgio Armani at the end of Steve's whistle stop European tour late last week. Armani and Samsung have produced two high-end phones before. Armani said he'd designed the phone using his "fashion aesthetic" and it was "perfect for managers".

The steampunk device is presumably not going to be included in a lot of mobile contract bundles given its high price: $1000 or €700.

There's a YouTube video of the launch here. ®

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