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Oracle not interested in Brocade

Larry say so

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Oracle's chief oracle has said he isn't interested in buying Brocade.

A couple of days ago it became known that Brocade might be readying itself for a buy-out, and the acquisitve Oracle was fingered as a possible parent.

But Larry Ellison reportedly answered a shareholder question at Oracle's annual shareholder conference on Wednesday and said Oracle wasn't interested in buying Brocade

Industry commentators have suggested that IBM might be interested in Brocade which would be reversal of the strategy under previous CEO Lou Gerstner who oversaw the sell-off of IBM's networking interests in 2000.

With consolidated IT stack suppliers coming into being, exmplified by Cisco getting into the server business and HP looking to centralise servers, storage and networking under the direction of David Donatelli, it could make sense for IBM to get back into the networking business.

So that's it; the Oracle overlord has spoken. Brocade is not headed to Redwood Shores, unless it's a negotiating ploy by Ellison. ®

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