Feeds

Mobile web polarizes as duellists pick their seconds

Verizon/Google vs AppleT&T

Top three mobile application threats

Verizon teams with Google

As long as this 'third way' remains over the horizon, vendors, software and web players, and carriers will continue to tussle with one another for the top spot in the mobile web value chain, and to agonise over choices of OS and apps partners. This week saw the US top two deepening their stand-off, not just over their flagship smartphones, but also their emerging own-brand web platforms.

As Verizon Wireless CEO Lowell McAdam took the stage with his Google counterpart Eric Schmidt, the key announcement was an agreement to co-develop Android devices that would carry the operator's brand and software portfolio, sitting separately from branded Android phones that Verizon is expected to launch soon (most likely, the Motorola Tao/Sholes and at least one product from HTC).

So far so predictable, given similar relationships that Google already has with Verizon development partner China Mobile and with CDMA rival Sprint. But the message was far broader and more aggressive than that - with footnotes like support for Google Voice and side-swipes at Apple, this was all about taking on AT&T, setting the new partners up as champions of openness against the closed iPhone world.

Details were scarce – the multiyear roadmap for the Verizon-Google collaborations include phones and netbooks, and potentially other formats in future, and two devices will be announced “shortly”. As well as PR value, both companies should gain in terms of choice of devices and apps, and speed to market. Google's weight will help Verizon Wireless in its ongoing campaign to woo open developers, after years when it did not need to look beyond its own platforms and partners. And the support of the major carrier should increase the confidence of developers and handset vendors in Android, encouraging them to create more products for the OS and to move existing projects up the agenda.

Verizon Wireless has been playing a will-they won't-they game with Android all year, though it has been embellishing its open developer initiative, as it faces the prospect of opening one of the most tightly controlled networks and software platforms in the world to open access (mandatory on its 700MHz spectrum). Android would logically form part of that initiative, though like the other US majors (except T-Mobile), Verizon Wireless has been cautious about committing itself too quickly to an untried platform with few handset choices. Instead, its first open steps have focused on Java, which it embraced firmly in June, its own app store plans, and some interest in LiMO; while its applications response to the AT&T iPhone has relied heavily on RIM. A year ago, CEO Lowell McAdam said: "We're planning on using Android. Android is an enabler of what we do” – but few concrete moves followed, until now.

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Virgin Media so, so SORRY for turning spam fire-hose on its punters
Hundreds of emails flood inboxes thanks to gaffe
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
AT&T dangles gigabit broadband plans over 100 US cities
So soon after a mulled Google Fiber expansion, fancy that
AT&T threatens to pull out of FCC wireless auctions over purchase limits
Company wants ability to buy more spectrum space in auction
Google looks to LTE and Wi-Fi to help it lube YouTube tubes
Bandwidth hogger needs tube embiggenment if it's to succeed
Turnbull gave NBN Co NO RULES to plan blackspot upgrades
NBN Co faces huge future Telstra bills and reduces fibre footprint
NBN Co plans fibre-to-the-basement blitz to beat cherry-pickers
Heading off at the pass operation given same priority as blackspot fixing
NBN Co in 'broadband kit we tested worked' STUNNER
Announcement of VDSL trial is not proof of concept for fibre-to-the-node
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.