Feeds

Greenpeace applauds Apple climate change flounce

Strange planetfellows

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Greenpeace - the environment-obsessed organization that famously protested outside of Steve Jobs' inaugural iPhone keynote - is now praising Jobs and his Apple cult for their stance on climate change.

Earlier this week, Apple flounced out of the US Chamber of Commerce after the chamber came out against a Congressional climate change bill, and Greenpeace is quite pleased.

"Apple has stormed out of the biggest lobby group in the United States," reads a statement posted to the Greepeace web site. "At issue is the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's use of funds to oppose climate change legislation. Apple has done the right thing, and IBM and Microsoft should think different too."

A long way, then, from January 2007: As Steve Jobs was inside San Francisco's Moscone Center unveiling the iPhone, Greenpeace was outside telling passersby that Apple hardware was threatening the future of the planet. The month before, Apple had ranked dead last among companies listed in Greenpeace's Green Electronics Guide.

Apparently, Steve Jobs' response was to tell the Greenpeace protesters to "get out of the computer business [and] go save some whales." But with the introduction of the new MacBook and MacBook Pro lines in October 2008, Apple seemed to tack the other way. Greenpeace praised Apple's effort to phase out all environment-unfriendly PVCs and BFRs from all products by the end of the year.

And now the not-profit is particularly chuffed about the Chamber exit. Jobs and company resigned from the Chamber of Commerce with a public letter to its president on Monday. "Apple is committed to protecting the environment and the communities in which we operate around the world," read the letter, signed by Apple vice president Catherine Novelli. "As a company we are working hard to reduce our own greenhouse gas emissions by relying on renewable energy at our facilities and designing more energy-efficient products for our customers...

"For those companies who cannot or will not do the same, Apple supports regulating greenhouse gas emissions, and it is frustrating to find the Chamber at odds with us in this effort."

The week before, Chamber president Thomas J. Donohue had released a statement saying that the Chamber supported "strong federal legislation and a binding international agreement to reduce carbon emissions and address climate change" while criticizing a bill passed by the US House of Representatives earlier this year. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
The British Museum plonks digital bricks on world of Minecraft
Institution confirms it's cool with joining the blocky universe
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.