Feeds

Top prices, old shows - the Beeb's iPlayer goes global

Filesharing, yes we've heard of that

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

The BBC's ramping up efforts to launch an iPlayer-like internet video service outside the UK, but has rejected using ad-funded model to squeeze as much money as possible from its programming.

BBC Worldwide managing director Luke Bradley-Jones told Paid Content the service would not offer the latest domestic UK shows to audiences abroad, but rather pay-per-view material from BBC's international channels like BBC America, "premium catalogue" material like Doctor Who and Torchwood, and content from the BBC's "deep archives."

The internet video service may also charge much higher prices than iTunes does for TV shows if they believe there's enough demand.

"Millions of people love Torchwood and would probably pay 10 bucks an episode rather than two bucks," Bradley-Jones said. Apparently BBCWW doesn't think sci-fi nerds on the internet aren't savvy enough to get the same shows sold cheaper elsewhere.

He dismissed the notion of an international iPlayer being a free service supported by advertisements, citing a weak market for digital ad sales. "You need real scale to deliver ad-funded content - Hulu's not there yet," Bradley-Jones said. Many shows, such as those on BBC America, are also only allowed to be sold online for licensing reasons.

The international iPlayer plans, reportedly six months in development, will first require approval from the BBC Trust, the corporation's governing arm.

In the meantime, BBCWW intends to sell applications on several mobile platforms, where it sees "a much higher willingness to pay for content." Commercial BBC mobile apps will likely cost around $2 and arrive in the next few months, Bradley-Jones said. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
4chan outraged by Emma Watson nudie photo leak SCAM
In the immortal words of Shaggy, it wasn't me us ... amirite?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.