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Active Media preps SuperSpeed SSD trio

Faster data rates for solid-states

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Buffalo and Freecom are currently fighting it out to launch the first USB 3.0 external HDDs, but Active Media (AM) looks set to steal the limelight with its launch of a SuperSpeed-supported external SSD range.

Active_Media_USB3_SSD

Active Media's Aviator 312 SSD: USB 3.0 connection

AM said its Aviator 312 SSD line offers read speeds of up to 240MB/s – far better than the 125MB/s and 130MB/s offered by Buffalo and Freecom, respectively.

Available in three flavours - 16GB, 32GB and 64GB - the drives also have maximum write speeds of 160MB/s, the firm promised.

Each 5mm-thick drive comes with a carry pouch and the all-important USB 3.0 Micro-B cable, suitable for connection into any USB port. Each drive is also compatible with USB 2.0 or 1.1, AM added.

Shipments of Active Media’s USB 3.0 SSD Aviator 312 trio will start during Q4, with the 16GB model priced at $89 (£55/€60), the 32GB at $119 (£74/€81) and the most capacious 64GB drive at $209 (£130/€142). UK prices haven’t been announced. ®

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