Feeds

Are you a pirate video star?

Broadcasting yourself is popular but does it help your business?

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Vendors seem to be champing at the bit in the video conferencing space. Is their persistence paying off? Some recent digging around suggests that the technology is gaining traction both officially and unofficially.

We asked around 200 people involved in workforce communication and collaboration about their official and unofficial use of video conferencing and video calling in their business. The official line can be seen in the figure below –just over 40 per cent of respondents claim widespread use of video across their business.

The number using the technology ‘unofficially’ is around a third. It is important to view this in context; respondents were from large organisations, where we would expect video conferencing to be more widely used. In the main, where unofficial use occurs, it is mirrored by official use. Limitations of the data aside, what we see is a picture of formal uptake on the one hand, and employees doing their own thing, on the other – with an overall reasonable level of adoption.

The rationale for using video isn’t rocket science and makes good sense: replacing travel to and from meetings seems like a valid option when travel budgets are under pressure. And surely it works so much better than audio conferencing? Multi-party audio conference calls, particularly when not everyone knows everyone else are usually muddled affairs at best. Video conferencing is designed to take the humble conference call to the next level, allowing those vital signs such as facial expression and body language to be captured.

In spite of the benefits, many users are still happy to muddle through with audio conference calls, or try and push for that bit extra in travel budget. Why might this be? There are two predominant reasons that spring to mind. For the record, these aren’t exclusive to video conferencing, but they do come up time and again with new technology implementations.

The first is whether or not the solution is fit for purpose - i.e. does it do the job it’s supposed to? This spans all aspects of the implementation – hardware, software, network capacity, firewall etc. If one of these isn’t properly addressed, then the system won’t do what’s expected of it and employees will simply reach for the phone next time.

The second reason relates to where video fits into an organisation’s overall communications strategy. Like any form of ‘advanced communications’ it is unlikely to be formally embraced by staff unless there is a real top-down drive to make it happen.

This includes ensuring that staff understand fully the rationale behind the implementation and have clear guidelines about its use. To some extent, unofficial use will act as a catalyst to wider and more frequent official use. In this and other areas, many organisations are getting to grips with the notion that their employees will find ways of assimilating their own personal technology habits and tweaks into their working routines. Taking a ‘glass half full’ approach, this could be seen as an opportunity to harness new ideas and best practices.

On a final note, there is still a question mark around where responsibility lies in terms of ‘getting it right’. Many businesses are happy to rely on vendors to tell them what they need, for a number of reasons – lack of available resources and lack of internal skills to name but two.

But there is adoption happening anyway, so one of the tasks ahead is to bring some consistency and cohesion to bear internally in the knowledge that there is a clear desire on behalf of the work force to use such advanced communications tools.

Freeform Dynamics Ltd

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
The cloud that goes puff: Seagate Central home NAS woes
4TB of home storage is great, until you wake up to a dead device
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
Intel offers ingenious piece of 10TB 3D NAND chippery
The race for next generation flash capacity now on
Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY
Pony up or push off, Zuck tells social marketeers
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
SAVE ME, NASA system builder, from my DEAD WORKSTATION
Anal-retentive hardware nerd in paws-on workstation crisis
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.