Feeds

Yahoofrastructure swells in face of Microsoft pact

Yes, we're a technology company

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Though it will eventually offload search to Steve Ballmer and Microsoft, Yahoo! has no intention of shrinking the new back-end infrastructure now driving its search technologies.

"What impact does the Microsoft search deal have on the Yahoo! cloud? It has no impact," Shelton Shugar, Yahoo!'s senior vp of cloud computing, tells The Reg. "All the services we're building, we will continue to build. All the roadmaps we have in place, we will continue to work towards."

For the past few years, Yahoo! has worked to build a unified collection of back-end platforms that can run all its online applications. Or at least most of them. Among other things, this so-called "private cloud" relies heavily on Hadoop, the open-source number-crunching platform based on Google's proprietary infrastructure.

According to Shugar, the company's search technologies eat up less than half of the resources served by its cloud, and when search departs for Redmond, other services are sure to fill the hole. "Search is just one of the many services [in use across the platform]. We use it for advertising. We use it for content. We use it for all of our usage logs. It is essentially becoming the data warehouse for all of Yahoo!" he says.

The company now has about 25,000 servers running Hadoop, and Shugar says "search is not the majority user."

Following the July agreement with Microsoft, Hadoop founder Doug Cutting left Yahoo! for the Hadoop-happy startup Cloudera, raising questions about Yahoo!'s future with the open source project. But Shugar says the company may even grow its core Hadoop team. "There will be no backing away from Hadoop. You may even see an acceleration."

Yahoo! is Hadoop's largest contributor, and the company will join the community as it descends on midtown Manhattan later this week for Hadoop World, the platform's first east coast developer conference.

Shugar says Yahoo! is still at work on an SQL-like Hadoop programming language that dovetails with a lower-level language known as Pig. Appropriately enough, the Yahooligans call it Pig SQL.

Yes, there's already an SQL-like Hadoop language: Hive, developed at Facebook. But much to the Facebook's chagrin, Yahoo! feels the need to build a language that better suits its existing Hadoop infrastructure. "We have this Pig stack. We have a lot of things built on this Pig stack, including an optimizer," Shugar says. "We want to keep that stack streamlined."

That said, the new language will be open-sourced.

One thing Yahoo! will not do - at least for the foreseeable future - is open up its infrastructure to external developers, as Google, Microsoft, and Amazon have done. Its private cloud will remain private. But, Shugar points out, Yahoo! is juicing developers through its open source contributions. Despite the media-fueled notion that it's nothing but an online advertising outfit, he insists, Yahoo! is still a technology company. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Cloud unicorns are extinct so DiData cloud mess was YOUR fault
Applications need to be built to handle TITSUP incidents
BOFH: WHERE did this 'fax-enabled' printer UPGRADE come from?
Don't worry about that cable, it's part of the config
Stop the IoT revolution! We need to figure out packet sizes first
Researchers test 802.15.4 and find we know nuh-think! about large scale sensor network ops
SanDisk vows: We'll have a 16TB SSD WHOPPER by 2016
Flash WORM has a serious use for archived photos and videos
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Business security measures using SSL
Examines the major types of threats to information security that businesses face today and the techniques for mitigating those threats.