Feeds

SFO kicks BAE corruption charges upstairs

Will Brown agree to prosecute the Labour Party? Err ...

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

Peston: "BAE is a significant part of the UK economy". About 0.003 of it, in fact.

DESO is gone now, replaced by a tentacle of the new biznovation ministry called the Defence and Security Organisation. It is now run by a former oil exec, and no longer has its offices inside MoD headquarters (which used to be a source of some pain to MoD procurement officials trying to plan their bargaining strategy against Brit arms firms - apparently they would often find armsbiz people from DESO innocently wandering in and out of their offices, earwigging their meetings etc).

But DSO still "works closely with the MoD" - in other words its people still have passes to MoD Main Building. Noticeably its boss ranks among the management team of UK Trade and Investment: no other business sector is represented at this level. There are those who'd say that actually little has changed with DESO's passing, and that in fact the tail still wags the dog.

That said, when Prime Minister Brown shut DESO down it did make BAE extremely angry. It could be that in future corruption cases, the government will no longer be the defendant, and it seems clear that Brown is willing to face up to BAE to some degree.

But the cases the SFO would now like to take to court date very much from the DESO era - and from the era of the present Labour government too, when Gordon Brown was in the Cabinet.

Furthermore, BAE Systems wields enormous political clout in Britain. Most people have failed to fully realise the extent to which it has either shut down or moved offshore, with fully 70 per cent of its employees overseas nowadays. Noted biz correspondents still foolishly assert that the firm is "the biggest manufacturer in the UK and a significant part of the British economy".

No matter that this is wildly at variance with the facts, as a swift glance at the Forbes list of the 40 biggest UK companies reveals. GlaxoSmithKline, Unilever, AstraZeneca and Diageo all have big manufacturing operations in Blighty; all have a much more valid claim to being the UK's biggest manufacturer than BAE, well down in the bottom half of the list.

BAE is certainly not a "significant part of the British economy", either: even company reps only claim that 50 per cent of the firm's global turnover takes place in the UK - almost certainly an exaggeration given that barely 30 per cent of its people are here - and that stacks up at a measly US$9bn, approximately three thousandths of the UK economy. Just to drive in the final nail, the vast majority of what business BAE does do in the UK involves supplying otherwise-unsaleable equipment to the British government at enormously inflated prices - scarcely an economic activity with any real benefits for the nation. To paraphrase Margaret Thatcher's pungent description of the old nationalised coal industry, much of BAE's vaunted manufacturing base here in the UK is in effect a (highly inefficient) system of indoor relief.

Unfortunately this reality isn't widely acknowledged, and the awkward fact remains that if Gordon Brown authorises the SFO's case he will in effect be prosecuting his own party's recent past record - to a large degree, prosecuting himself.

BAE issued a statement today, saying:

If the Director of the SFO obtains the consent that he seeks from the Attorney General and proceedings are commenced, the Company will deal with any issues raised in those proceedings at the appropriate time and, if necessary, in court.

It's all too likely that this case will get precisely as far as the Saudi one did: into the door of No. 10 Downing Street and not a step further. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders
Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google
'Irrelevant' character evidence should be excluded – lawyers
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Ex-Tony Blair adviser is new top boss at UK spy-hive GCHQ
Robert Hannigan to replace Sir Iain Lobban in the autumn
Alphadex fires back at British Gas with overcharging allegation
Brit colo outfit says it paid for 347KVA, has been charged for 1940KVA
Jack the RIPA: Blighty cops ignore law, retain innocents' comms data
Prime minister: Nothing to see here, go about your business
Banks slap Olympus with £160 MEEELLION lawsuit
Scandal hit camera maker just can't shake off its past
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.