Feeds

US wireless carriers demand more spectrum

Three times more! ASAP!

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The US wireless industry lobby has written to the FCC, asking for another 800MHz of spectrum to offset "looming crisis" for American businesses.

The submission to the FCC again claims that the American mobile networks desperately need more spectrum allocated to them, while drawing irreverent comparisons with Europe and predicting dire consequences if their demands aren't immediately met.

Basically, the CTIA wants 800MHz of additional radio spectrum found and handed over. And the sooner the better:

"The US should immediately set itself on a course to identify a target of at least 800MHz of additional spectrum for licensed commercial wireless use within the next six years," says the filing with the FCC.

Not that the US networks are profligate with their spectrum usage: The CTIA reckons that no-one uses spectrum more efficiently, claiming that "US carriers serve more than three times more consumers per MHz than carriers in the United Kingdom." Of course, it helps to have one fifth the population density (31 people per square km, compared to 250) but that detail seems to have been glossed over - again.

Even more liberties are taken when talking about Ofcom's future plans: "Ofcom, the UK regulator has identified and is in the process of reallocating an additional 355 MHz of spectrum for CMRS", that's "Commercial Mobile Radio Services" to the rest of us and bollocks too. Ofcom is auctioning off a whole lot of spectrum it's true, but the regulator is working very hard avoid allocating anything to anyone. Ofcom believes the free market will decide what radio spectrum is for and that could be CRMS. Or TV broadcasting. Or even remote controls for cats. Ofcom doesn't care.

But the CTIA is clear that newly identified spectrum should be paired up as quickly as possible, especially the chunk between 1755MHz and 1780MHz, which it has identified as a good place to start: "Such a pairing of spectrum bands would allow for a rapid auction of 50 megahertz of paired spectrum*".

Pairing up the spectrum, to provide one frequency for an uplink and another for down, is important for Frequency Division Duplexed systems such as UMTS and LTE, but it is an unnecessary encumbrance to Time Division based systems such as WiMAX. It could be argued that it's best to just sell of the spectrum and let the buyer match up pairs if they want to, but that wouldn't favour companies who have already invested millions in LTE deployments - and who happen to be members of the CTIA.

* When combined with the already-available allocation at 2155-2180 MHz.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.