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iPhone voted UK's 'coolest brand'

Drives Aston Martin from top spot

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The iPhone has been elected as Britain's "coolest brand", knocking Aston Martin off the top of the CoolBrands list of desirables that it has dominated for three years.

CoolBrands chairman Stephen Cheliotis said: "The iPhone is something everyone's been talking about. There has been such a buzz around it - and people that haven't got one, want one."*

In further gusset-moistening news for fanbois, and to the utter dismay of Church of Jobs sceptics, Apple itself took third place and its iPod weighed in in fourth spot.

Other tech notables in the top 20 are Nintendo, PlayStation, Xbox and, somewhat disturbingly, the Beeb's iPlayer.

Inevitably, both Google and YouTube also wowed the crowds, while the traditional luxury brand flag was flown by Dom Perignon, Ferrari and Rolex. Here's the manifest of leading cool:

  1. iPhone
  2. Aston Martin
  3. Apple
  4. iPod
  5. Nintendo
  6. YouTube
  7. BlackBerry
  8. Google
  9. Bang & Olufsen
  10. PlayStation
  11. Xbox
  12. Tate Modern
  13. Dom Perignon
  14. Virgin Atlantic
  15. Ferrari
  16. Sony
  17. Mini
  18. Vivienne Westwood
  19. Rolex
  20. BBC iPlayer

Notables who dropped from the top twenty this year were Agent Provocateur, Nike and Facebook. The first two did, however, top their respective categories (Fashion - Lingerie, and Sportswear & Equipment).

Other brands strutting their stuff in the full list (pdf) of the 500 laureates are Flickr, Last.fm, MySpace, Skype and Twitter. Inexplicably, Playmobil failed to make the cut, but Marmite and Guinness displayed their enduring coolness, with the latter topping the top tipple category.

And in case you're wondering just who decided what's cool right now, Superbrands UK asked and "independent and voluntary Expert Council" and 2,450 UK consumers on the YouGov panel to contemplate a list of around 1,100 shortlisted brands.

There are more details on the selection process here (pdf).

Bootnote

* iDon't.

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