Feeds

iPhone App Store tops 2,000,000,000 downloads

9.5 million farts

High performance access to file storage

Apple's iTunes App Store has hit yet another milestone: two billion apps downloaded since the Store hung out its digital shingle on July 11, 2008.

The news came in an Apple announcement which also noted that the store's customers now include over 50 million iPhone and iPod touch owners worldwide - in 77 countries, to be exact.

Those worthies can now choose from among more than 85,000 apps created by 125,000 registered members of Apple’s iPhone Developer Program.

Say what you will about Apple's strong-arm control of what gets inserted into its sleek and shiny handhelds, but it's clear that the public has bought into the Apple ecosystem in a big way.

And the App Store juggernaut shows no signs of slowing. Quite the opposite - it's pedal-to-the-metal accelerating. The Store reached one billion downloads in April of this year, nine months after it launched. Shortly after its first birthday it had distributed 1.5 billion, and now - five months after its one-billion milestone, it has hit two billion.

Apple, however, doesn't reveal how many of the downloads are of paid apps and how many are free. The app trackers at Mobclix, however, do provide a breakdown - and their latest count claims over 65,000 paid and a hair under 20,000 free.

Mobclix also provides a breakdown by category, with games and entertainment apps leading the way at 16,603 and 12,656, respectively, as of September 23.

That's a lot of fart apps. In fact, a search on "fart" in the Store turns up 406 downloadable impersonations of the fine art of clearing one's nether throat.

If one were to assume that fart apps are downloaded at the same rate as other apps - an insupportable assumption, of course, but allow us the fantasy of such an extrapolation - those 406 apps would account for over 9.5 million instances of iPhone and iPod touch poots, toots, and related digital windbreaking.

Luckily, among the 85,000 apps in the Store are enough truly useful apps to balance the juvenile lunacy - think Pandora Radio, Shazam, Remote, Quickoffice, Kindle, LogMeIn Ignition (App Store links), and many, many more.

The iTunes App Store is a success. The doubters were wrong. Steve Jobs was right. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
Broadband Secretary of SHEEP sensationally quits Cabinet
Maria Miller finally resigns over expenses row
Skype pimps pro-level broadcast service
Playing Cat and Mouse with the media
Beat it, freetards! Dyn to shut down no-cost dynamic DNS next month
... but don't worry, charter members, you're still in 'for life'
EE dismisses DATA-BURNING glitch with Orange Mail app
Bug quietly slurps PAYG credit - yet EE denies it exists
Like Google, Comcast might roll its own mobile voice network
Says anything's possible if regulators approve merger with Time Warner
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.