Feeds

Intel powers down Xeons for microservers

Saving the world, one blade at a time

3 Big data security analytics techniques

IDF Intel is introducing a reference design for what it calls "a new category" of microservers, along with low-wattage Xeon processors to power them.

The term "microserver" has been bandied about for some time now, with various and sundry vendors dipping their toes into the market for small, low-power, densely packed systems. Now Intel is reviving it in conjuntion with two new quad-core Xeons, the 45W Xeon L3426 and an even lower-power part scheduled for the first quarter of 2010, which will weigh in at a cool 30W.

Sean Maloney, EVP and co-director of the Intel Architecture Group, introduced the new Xeons at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco, noting that "It wasn't so long ago that people were trying to squeeze 30 watts into ugly notebooks."

Maloney said that the need for lower-power systems is clear. "Up to 25 per cent of the data center," he said, "is going to power."

Although a broad range of schemes are being used to address the power problem - Maloney cited denser blades, denser packages, optimized racks, and data-center containerization - he also said that "We do think the time is right to push into another new segment." And that would be what Intel is redubbing "microservers."

To that end, Intel is introducing a reference design for what it hopes will be a burgeoning microserver market segment. The reference design will fit 16 hot-swappable microserver modules into a 5U rack.

Stating the obvious - a time-honored tradition at keynotes - Maloney said that the microserver category "won't replace [other server] categories, it will augment them."

To support his microserver push, Maloney brought onto the keynote stage Andy Bechtolsheim, an industry vet who was the engineering brains behind the founding of Sun Microsystems and who is now the chief development officer and chairman of Arista Networks.

Bechtolsheim ladled his praise for the microserver concept with caveats, however, telling Maloney that "We have been talking to some of your engineers about this topic for a couple of months now, and it seems to me that as long as the microserver still has ECC memory, can do virtualization, and can support a decent amount of memory, it will be a very, very successful product."

Exactly whether Bechtolsheim's concerns are met by the reference design isn't yet clear. Despite Maloney saying that its microserver specs are available on Intel's website, they have yet to appear as of mid-Wednesday. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.