Feeds

EMC offers cascading replication

Hopes to make lugging boxes of tapes a thing of the past

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Aiming to knock another nail in tape's coffin, EMC has improved its Data Domain replication capability to chip away at another tape advantage.

Many data centres ship tapes between sites for disaster recovery (DR), with important data centres protected by two other sites and with remote data centres protected by a central one. Replicating data across network links between data centres is often done on a point-to-point basis, making it harder to protect a data centre with two DR sites.

EMC's Data Domain unit has added cascaded replication to its Replicator software, which enables the transfer of deduped data over low-bandwidth WAN links for disaster recovery-type purposes. The cascading means customers can extend replication of de-duped data to a third destination or to additional offsite locations.

The software now supports up to 180-to-1 remote site fan-in to a single controller for expanded automated cross-site deduplication. EMC says it also has up to 100 per cent faster directory replication throughput using optimised, multi-stream replication.

EMC cites Brian Babineau, an ESG senior analyst, who says: "According to our 2009 spending survey, the top storage investment enterprises plan to make is in replication for offsite data protection. It is clear that companies want to shift from transporting backup tapes as the primary means of moving data between multiple sites, so long as they can find an affordable disk alternative."

For customers that prefer to stay with tape, EMC will supply tape products sourced through Quantum.

NetApp has also been busy separately on the replication front. It has added compression to its SnapMirror thin replication product and claims customers can improve network bandwidth efficiency by up to 70 per cent. Bandwidth requirements for Exchange can be reduced by 33 per cent, Microsoft Home Directory by 63 per cent, and Oracle Database by 72 per cent. These numbers are based on NetApp's own testing. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
No biggie: EMC's XtremIO firmware upgrade 'will wipe data'
But it'll have no impact and will be seamless, we're told
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.