Feeds

Motorola's latest enterprise handset screams as it falls

And will tell on you afterwards

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Motorola's latest enterprise-ready mobile computer is really a mobile phone, but don't tell the handset division, as they're Android mad over there.

The MC9500 is a Windows Mobile-based device, but one with interchangeable keypads, a user-replaceable radio module and a battery monitor embedded into the battery. It also comes with a price tag knocking on $3,000, but volume discounts will apply.

Motorola MC9500

You can make phone calls on it too

And volume usage is what's expected - the handset comes with an integral bar code reader - 2D by default, but with an optional 3D scanner. The demonstration video shows one being dropped from the tail lift of a truck, showing the kind of place where Motorola expects this particular handset to find its home.

Enterprises are much more conservative than consumers, so features like a three megapixel camera and Windows Mobile 6.1 are pretty cutting edge. The MC9500 even has a 3G radio option - something its predecessor (the MC9000) lacked. It also has an infra-red port, something taken out as redundant from the MC9000 but returned by popular request. Apparently utilities have been busy fitting IrDA outputs into their meters and need a device that can read them.

Like all popular handsets, the MC9500 boasts an accelerometer, but it's the first we've seen that screams when in free fall. Apparently it's a safety feature, though it logs such drops for reporting back to management too. Sadly, they're going to have to take the scream out before putting in to the hands of the end users, as it's way too much fun and results in the handset getting dropped frequently.

But the model is designed to take such drops in its stride, along with 30 minutes submersion in water and the usual rugged-type things that industrial handsets have to endure. It's also surprisingly comfortable to catch, thanks to careful counterweighting.

A remarkable design to come out of Motorola, but then the Enterprise Mobility Solutions department is keen to show how it lies at the opposite end of the company from the handset division and its headlong dash towards Android. After all, the Enterprise division of Motorola makes money, which it seems isn't actually against company policy at all. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Virgin Media so, so SORRY for turning spam fire-hose on its punters
Hundreds of emails flood inboxes thanks to gaffe
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
AT&T threatens to pull out of FCC wireless auctions over purchase limits
Company wants ability to buy more spectrum space in auction
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
Facebook splats in-app chat, whacks brats into crack yakety-yak app
Jibber-jabbering addicts turfed out just as Zuck warned
Google looks to LTE and Wi-Fi to help it lube YouTube tubes
Bandwidth hogger needs tube embiggenment if it's to succeed
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.