Feeds

Motorola's latest enterprise handset screams as it falls

And will tell on you afterwards

The essential guide to IT transformation

Motorola's latest enterprise-ready mobile computer is really a mobile phone, but don't tell the handset division, as they're Android mad over there.

The MC9500 is a Windows Mobile-based device, but one with interchangeable keypads, a user-replaceable radio module and a battery monitor embedded into the battery. It also comes with a price tag knocking on $3,000, but volume discounts will apply.

Motorola MC9500

You can make phone calls on it too

And volume usage is what's expected - the handset comes with an integral bar code reader - 2D by default, but with an optional 3D scanner. The demonstration video shows one being dropped from the tail lift of a truck, showing the kind of place where Motorola expects this particular handset to find its home.

Enterprises are much more conservative than consumers, so features like a three megapixel camera and Windows Mobile 6.1 are pretty cutting edge. The MC9500 even has a 3G radio option - something its predecessor (the MC9000) lacked. It also has an infra-red port, something taken out as redundant from the MC9000 but returned by popular request. Apparently utilities have been busy fitting IrDA outputs into their meters and need a device that can read them.

Like all popular handsets, the MC9500 boasts an accelerometer, but it's the first we've seen that screams when in free fall. Apparently it's a safety feature, though it logs such drops for reporting back to management too. Sadly, they're going to have to take the scream out before putting in to the hands of the end users, as it's way too much fun and results in the handset getting dropped frequently.

But the model is designed to take such drops in its stride, along with 30 minutes submersion in water and the usual rugged-type things that industrial handsets have to endure. It's also surprisingly comfortable to catch, thanks to careful counterweighting.

A remarkable design to come out of Motorola, but then the Enterprise Mobility Solutions department is keen to show how it lies at the opposite end of the company from the handset division and its headlong dash towards Android. After all, the Enterprise division of Motorola makes money, which it seems isn't actually against company policy at all. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.