Feeds

RBS WorldPay downplays database hack reports

'No access to either merchant or cardholder accounts'

High performance access to file storage

Updated RBS WorldPay and a hacker are at loggerheads over the seriousness of a supposed breach on websites run by the payment processing firm.

Security shortcomings - since blocked - on RBS WorldPay website exposed confidential information, including admin passwords and the contact details of partners, according to blog posts by Romanian hacker Unu.

The grey-hat hacker previously exposed similar problems on the websites of the UK parliament and HSBC France, among many others. As before he published screenshots to back up his latest claims.

RBS WorldPay initially responded to our inquiries by saying that the reported SQL injection attacks mounted by Unu were thrown against test websites. All the dummy data involved was fictitious and in no way confidential, so there was no breach.

Unu disputes this and has posted further screenshots that appear to show SQL injection problems with the German version of RBS WorldPay's website. The hacker claims that RBS WorldPay has blocked public access to the website locations covered by his first set of screenshots, blocking possible exploitation, but that other SQL injection problems on its sites remain unaddressed.

In a statement issued on Friday afternoon, RBS WorldPay said that a security audit has established that access to either merchants or cardholder accounts was not possible via any of the reported vulnerabilities.

RBS WorldPay have thoroughly investigated reports of a technical vulnerability on our website. We have taken the report very seriously, and enforced immediate security measures.

Any information the unauthorised third party found would not provide access to either merchants or cardholder accounts.

We take data security very seriously, and regularly review the way in which we protect customer and consumer data.

As part of our ongoing commitment to protecting customer data, we will be conducting an additional assessment of the circumstances, and continue to make further security re-enforcements where appropriate.

SQL injection flaws, a class of vulnerability we've previously compared to running Jedi mind tricks on weak-willed drones, lie at the bottom of all the problems reported by Unu.

The flaws make it possible to trick back-end databases into coughing up sensitive data in response to commands tacked onto the end of URLs entered into a browser. This is a common class of vulnerability, as illustrated by a recent survey of website security by UK-based penetration testing firm NTA Monitor, but all the more serious when it crops up on the website of a large financial services operation, such as RBS WorldPay.

The Royal Bank of Scotland Group business processes millions of payments every day. An RBS WorldPay spokeswoman said took site security issues seriously, a point supported by its prompt responses to our inquiries on Thursday. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Bad PUPPY: Undead Windows XP deposits fresh scamware on lawn
Installing random interwebs shiz will bork your zombie box
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.