Feeds

Oz government sites floored in firewall protests

Small earthquake in Canberra. Not many websites hurt

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Hackers reportedly knocked over the website of Australian prime minister Kevin Rudd for a few minutes on Wednesday in an apparent protest against government plans for compulsory internet content filtering.

The site of the Australian Communications and Media Authority also disappeared for about an hour Wednesday evening local time, The Australian reports. The website of Communications Minister Stephen Conroy, the man behind the plan, also came under attack.

A website called the Inquisitor, which reportedly claimed responsibility for the attacks, compared the net filtering plans of the Australian government to those of China. It also predicted that applying censorware would be effective only in reducing net access speeds by as much as 70 per cent while leaving unsavory content still accessible.

Anonymous, the group involved in a long-running campaign against Scientology, has also placed the Australian government in its cross-hairs, as a manifesto against the controversial filtering plans at 09-09-2009.org explains. The group called for the Australian government to abandon its filtering plans and for the resignation of Stephen Conroy. "Failure to meet these demands will result in our full-fledged wrath. This is not something you want to happen," it warned.

A spokesman for the communications minister Senator Conroy described the protests as misguided, adding that the filter would only block illegal content such as "imagery of child sexual abuse, rape and bestiality".

Net security firm Arbor Networks said it had seen no evidence as yet of any DDoS campaign. A post-mortem on the attack by the Internet Storm Centre points towards a low-level hand-cranked effort.

"The attack seems to be mostly multiple web requests on the site which exhausts the threads on the web server causing it to respond with a 503 error," an Internet Storm Centre researcher notes. "Once left alone by a few of the attackers the site is again more than happy. As far as impact goes the net result seems to be zilch." ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.