Feeds

Silverlight swallows off-line DRM pill

Four's the glory

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The next version of Microsoft's Silverlight will cozy up to media giants with out-of-browser digital rights management (DRM).

Microsoft said Tuesday it will provide a preview demonstration Silverlight 4.0 this weekend that will feature DRM for content delivered offline and that is powered by its PlayReady technology.

The company said in a statement the feature would: "Enable movie studios and retailers to provide the same rich interactive experiences via digital copy and Internet distribution as consumers get with DVD or Blu-ray."

Silverlight 4 will let studios offer network-delivered updates, special offers, and live events, Microsoft said.

It sounds like Silverlight 4 will protect streamed entertainment in addition to letting the player run protected DVDs and Blu-ray discs.

Silverlight 4 will also support native multicast support, which Microsoft said it planned to preview at the International Broadcasting Conference in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Multicast enables the broadcast of a signal simultaneously to different receivers. The company did not give a date for when Silverlight 4 will be released.

DRM and multicast will be designed to woo film studios and broadcasters and convince more of them to build and deliver content using its challenger to Adobe Systems' Flash. Those who've signed up to Silverglight in the past include last year's NBC Beijing Olympics and Netflix, although the latter has suffered glitches and slow streaming.

Microsoft also said Tuesday that it has released the IIS Media Services 3.0 and tools, for HTTP-based streaming of content.

Also, Microsoft's released its IIS Smooth Streaming Transport Protocol and the Protected Interoperable File Format (PIFF) specification under its Community Promise. Smooth Streaming lets Silverlight adapt to the bandwidth on a network to minimize the break down in reception for the viewer. PIFF is a file format to deliver and playback multimedia content.

The Community Promise is Microsoft's pledge not to assert any patent claims it might own against those selling or distributing an implementation of a Microsoft technology. Microsoft's C# language specification also covered by the promise.

"In publishing PIFF and the IIS Smooth Streaming Transport Protocol, Microsoft intends to promote industry adoption of a video format optimized for internet delivery, interoperable among a wide range of consumer devices, and openly available for use by all publishers to enable secure distribution and playback of high-value video," the company said in a statement. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
Whistling Google: PLEASE! Brussels can only hurt Europe, not us
And Commish is VERY pro-Google. Why should we worry?
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.