Feeds

Good Housekeeping readers play hunt the G-spot

Middle England tickles its stiff upper lips

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

In a final death blow for the values which once made Blighty great - long shadows on cricket grounds, warm beer, invincible green suburbs, dog lovers, triumphant foreign wars, etc, etc - Good Housekeeping has published a reader guide to the top five vibrators.

For its October issue, the "housewives' bible" (as the Telegraph puts it) asked a panel of readers aged between 30 and 65 to spread 'em for the UK's top-selling orgasm assistants. They rated the devices for "ease of use, instructions, noisiness and satisfaction".

The winner was the "Delight", an s-shaped pleasurer*, which scored an impressive 74 out of 100. Next up was the "Bedside Bullet" (68/100), closely followed by an unspecified but promising "warming vibrator".

The famous Rampant Rabbit was fourth, clocking up 61 out of 100. Quite which vibro came fifth, the Telegraph doesn't say, and we're not buying a copy of Good Housekeeping to find out.

In case you're wondering whether the volunteers were reluctantly dragged from their dusting and coffee mornings to lie back and think of England, 87 per cent of testers said they'd already used a vibrator and "52 per cent of testers’ husbands suggested they should try one".

Good Housekeeping deputy ed, June Walton, confirmed that things had indeed changed since the magazine launched back in 1922. She said: “Even though Sex And The City has removed the ‘guilty’ tag from owning a sex toy, and it’s widely recognised that many young, single women own vibrators, our survey discovered that they’re just as popular among our readers - only 13 per cent of our testers were vibrator virgins.” ®

Bootnote

*Manufactured by German sex toy outfit Fun Factory, in case you fancy confirming the Good Housekeeping result.

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Forget the beach 'n' boardwalk, check out the Santa Cruz STEVE JOBS FOUNTAIN
Reg reader snaps shot of touching tribute to Apple icon
Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL
Bank: 'We are now safely patched.' Customers: 'You were using OpenSSL?'
Happy 40th Playmobil: Reg looks back at small, rude world of our favourite tiny toys
Little men straddle LOHAN, attend tiny G20 Summit... ah, sweet memories...
Spanish village called 'Kill the Jews' mulls rebranding exercise
Not exactly attractive to the Israeli tourist demographic
Lego is the TOOL OF SATAN, thunders Polish priest
New minifigs like Monster Fighters are turning kids to the dark side
Dark SITH LORD 'Darth Vader' joins battle to rule, er, Ukraine
Only I can 'make an empire out of a republic' intones presidential candidate
Chinese company counters pollution by importing fresh air
Citizens line up for bags of that sweet, sweet mountain air
Google asks April Fools: Want a job? Be our 'Pokemon Master'
Mountain View is prankin' like it's 1999...
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.