Feeds

EU may delay Oracle's Sun acquisition

Golden 'chutes not deployed

Security for virtualized datacentres

European regulators could help create a further delay in the closure of Oracle's planned $5.6bn acquisition of Sun Microsystems.

Reuters has reported European Union anti-trust authorities are sill deciding whether to approved he deal by Thursday's deadline, with concern centered on Oracle's ownership of MySQL.

A decision to not automatically approve the deal and to proceed to a review would spark an investigation that could last up to four months potentially pushing closure into the beginning of 2010. With the clock ticking, a decision on whether to investigate has not been taken.

If the EU does decide to investigate it would mean the latest set back to Oracle's acquisition. The Reg understands from Sun insiders the deal has already missed at least one closure date, with executes steering the deal missing out on a planned allocation of stock as a result.

Oracle's purchase of Sun was last month cleared by US regulators at the Department of Justice (DoJ), after concern initially surfaced over implications for the way Java is licensed

At the time, Oracle's lawyers issued a brisk statement that dismissed the notion anti-trust on Java would delay the deal and stressed its cordial dealings with the DoJ.

Europe could be a different matter. Regulators have proved notoriously resistant to US companies and their lawyers trying to fast-track decisions or side step the process.

If there is a regulatory catch, though, it's likely to have been the fact Java will be owned and licensed by one of the largest Java vendors. The catch would be the terms and conditions Oracle made Java available under.

The EU last month certainly suggested this could be an issue, when it said it was examining the deal and would be done by September 3.

On databases, while Oracle might have dominant market share in RDBMS, this remains a relatively diverse market while MySQL largely plays in a different segment. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
SMASH the Bash bug! Apple and Red Hat scramble for patch batches
'Applying multiple security updates is extremely difficult'
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
'Google is NOT the gatekeeper to the web, as some claim'
Plus: 'Pretty sure iOS 8.0.2 will just turn the iPhone into a fax machine'
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.