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Caviar Black gets 2TB model

WD expands range upwards

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WD has uprated its four-platter, 2TB disk technology to 7200rpm with Caviar Black and WD-RE4 models.

This move was foreshadowed by leaks from European resellers earlier this month. The first 3.5in 2TB products from WD spun at 5,400rpm.

WD Caviar Black 2TB

Capacities range from 500GB, through 640GB, 750GB and 1TB, up to 2TB. In the 2TB product, the read/write head has a two-stage actuator, with the second stage driven by piezo-electronic technology for more precise head-to-track positioning. Interestingly this is technology used by UK start-up DataSlide in its hard rectangular drive technology.

In all models, except the 500GB and 640GB ones, the drive motor shaft is secured at both ends to reduce system-induced vibration. This so-called StableTrac technology helps stabilise the platters for more accurate tracking. Clearly, WD has been pushing the technology envelope out to get the reliable data access it needed.

There is a 64MB cache and WD says the drive has a couple of integrated processors for greater controller performance. The interface is 3Gb/s Sata, with no SAS interface mentioned.

The Caviar Black model is meant for gamers, high-end desktops and workstations. The WD-RE4 version, with its 1.2 million hours before failure rating, is for servers, network-attached storage (NAS) and storage area network (SAN) usage.

The Caviar Black 2TB GB (model WD2001FASS) drives are available now through WD distributors and resellers, with a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of $329 plus local VAT (£232.00). The RE4 2TB (model WD2003FYYS) drive is currently being qualified by OEMs. Both drives have a five-year limited warranty. ®

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