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Dot Hill punts array of disk arrays

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Dot Hill is adding iSCSI RAID storage offerings to its small-form factor 2.5-inch disk array product line, as well as three new products to its mainstream 2000 series disk arrays.

The 2322 iSCSI SAN array uses 2.5-inch disk drives, while the 2532 DAS host-SAS array, 2332 iSCSI, and 2732 4Gbit/s Fibre Channel SAN arrays use 3.5-inch disks. Dot Hill says that compared to their predecessors, the new products have greater processing power, ease-of-use, significantly higher performance and larger capacities-per-controller domain.

The 2732 Fibre Channel 3.5-inch disk-based array delivers 230,000 input/output operations per second (IOPS), more than double the 90,000 IOPS of its 2730 predecessor. The new storage systems offer greater expansion, with the ability to add 96 drives, 40 more than previous versions, supporting total capacities of up to 192TB using the latest 2TB drives and Dot Hill’s family of compatible JBOD expansion arrays.

Dot Hill announced 2TB drive qualification in July and started shipping these drives to customers last week.

The array software is pretty capable. Dot Hill’s volume copy software, AssuredCopy, provides the ability to create full volume copies or backups of disk volumes, with the ability to restore whole volumes, folders or individual files.

AssuredSnap, Dot Hill’s snapshot functionality, provides the ability to create up to 256 point-in-time copies or backups of disk volumes with instant restoration of data to any captured (snapshot) point in time. Since AssuredSnap only copies data that has changed to disk in real time, it can, Dot Hill says, virtually eliminate backup windows. This contrasts with traditional backup techniques, which require large windows of time to copy data to a backup volume.

The new Dot Hill 2322, 2332, 2532, and 2732 Series arrays are available now. Street prices are expected to start at $11,000. ®

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