Feeds

Nokia announces Linux-based smartphone

But insists the N900 is an internet tablet'

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

Nokia has launched what it calls an "internet tablet", though the device's size, shape and set of features will seem to many to put it slap bang in the smartphone category.

N900_01

Nokia's N900: internet tablet or smartphone?

The N900 – which leaked out earlier this week – runs Maemo 5.0, a Linux-derived OS that the firm has installed on its previous internet tablet devices and which, it has been claimed, could replace Symbian as Nokia's high-end smartphone operating system.

Nokia steered clear of a flat denial on plans to replace Symbian with Maemo on its smartphones, stating instead that Maemo merely “complements Nokia’s other software platforms, such as Symbian”.

Designed to deliver “computer-grade performance in a compact size”, the N900 features an ARM-based Cortex-A8 processor and up to 1GB of application memory, Nokia said. User-accessible memory tops out at 32GB, but is expandable to 48GB using Micro SD cards.

N900_03

Users get up to 42GB of storage and Wi-Fi support

Maemo allows users to have “dozens” of application windows open and running simultaneously, Nokia added, all of which are accessed and manipulated using the N900’s touchscreen display and slide-out Qwerty keyboard.

Able to support wireless web speeds of up to 10Mb/s HSPDA 3G - 2Mb/s HSUPA - the N900 can also access the web over a Wi-Fi connection. In case you thought the cellular radio was for data only, the N900 will apparently let you make and take voice calls, and send and receive texts and MMS messages. It also has a voice-call... er... webcam.

The phone’s web browser is still somewhat of a mystery, but Nokia said that it’s based on Mozilla technology. Adobe Flash 9.4 is also supported.

The N900’s other tech treats include Assisted GPS, an FM transmitter and a 5Mp camera.

Nokia will display the N900 at its annual conference next week. The smartphone... sorry... internet tablet will be available to buy in as-yet unspecified selected markets from October. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Bose says today is F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle
Music gear giant seeks some of that sweet, sweet Apple pie
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Microsoft confirms secret Surface will never see the light of day
Microsoft's form 8-K records decision 'not to ship a new form factor'
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.