Feeds

How to run Mac OS X on a generic PC

No need for hacked software

Intelligent flash storage arrays

However, for the less stout of heart there's a much simpler alternative. But it's not free, or even cheap. I fell into it at the end of last year when an outfit called Art Studios Entertainment Media (ASEM) sent me a small black square object in an elegant magnet-latched cardboard case about the size of a packet of ten cigarettes. The object itself isn't much bigger than a large postage stamp, and is designed to plug into a USB header on a generic Intel motherboard.

EFiX in situ

Clip EFiX into a spare USB header on your motherboard

ASEM calls it EFI-X - or EFiX; they don't seem to have made up their minds about this - as it's an eXtension of Intel's Extensible Firmware Interface. The ASEM extension includes everything the Intel hardware needs to assure a Mac OS X installation or update that it's dealing with a kosher Macintosh.

Although EFiX reduces the hairiness level from full beard to neat moustache, there are still some gotchas and caveats. The hardware compatibility list (HCL) of motherboards, graphics cards and other core components that EFiX is guaranteed to work with is limited. The limitation seems to be a Venn-type intersection between Apple's own HCL and the list of EFI drivers that ASEM has been able to allocate resources to developing so far. In particular, it doesn't include any processors from AMD.

This means you probably won't just be able to stick the EFiX onto whatever Windows machine you're running at the present and reboot into the glory of Apple's current version of Mac OS X, Leopard.

But it's not too bad. Thanks to Gigabyte, Intel, Nvidia, Crucial and CoolerMaster, I assembled a GA-EP45-DS3R motherboard, quad-core Pentium Q9450, GeForce 8800 GTX graphic card, 4GB of Ballistix Ram and a Real Power M850 power supply for the test system.

EFiX in situ

And stick EFiX to your PSU - there's a sticker provided

And I still couldn't get it working. It was the usual cause of failure - neglecting to RTFM - mitigated in this case by the fact that there was at this stage no FM to read. There is now, but back then I got as far as the first part of the Leopard installation when the process irredeemably blue-screened.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Nexus 7 fandroids tell of salty taste after sucking on Google's Lollipop
Web giant looking into why version 5.0 of Android is crippling older slabs
Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU
Cupertino stands down after Euro legal threats
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Bada-Bing! Mozilla flips Firefox to YAHOO! for search
Microsoft system will be the default for browser in US until 2020
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.