Feeds

Cisco Wireless LANs at risk from 'skyjacking' flaw

Catchily named vuln is all talk so far

New hybrid storage solutions

Security researchers have discovered a potential denial of service or information stealing flaw affecting Cisco's wireless networking kit.

The snappily-monikered skyjacking flaw affects lightweight Cisco wireless access points or networks running Over-the-Air-Provisioning (OTAP).

With OTAP enabled, newly connected Cisco access points listen in to an unencrypted multicast data stream to find the address of the nearest controller, which is used to manage access points. Much the same process happens if the established controller temporarily drops offline.

The approach creates a potential means for hackers to set up a counterfeit controller, which clients would connect onto once the legitimate controller is identified and hit by a denial of service attack, Dark Reading reports.

Wireless security specialist AirMagnet discovered the vulnerability in the lab. Real life exploits of the security weakness remain unlogged by AirMagnet or anyone else.

AirMagnet has informed Cisco of the vulnerability. While Cisco is evaluating the issue enterprises are advised to consider either disabling the OTAP feature or using wireless intrusion detection kit to mitigate against attack. Happily for all concerned, AirMagnet is a leading supplier of wireless IDS equipment.

Flaws in wireless networks seem to attract catchy monikers. After the Evil Twins attack of 2005, we had wi-phishing (phishing fraud using wireless network attack vectors). 'Cafe Latte' attacks and now a so-called skyjacking flaw. Catchy names attract attention and tend to result in a greater volume of press attention, sometimes irrespective of how serious a threat they pose in practice.

It may not have a catchy name but the flaw in the wireless network of TJX stores that allowed hackers to siphon off an estimated 40 million sets of credit and debit card account details is obviously much more important. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Google recommends pronounceable passwords
Super Chrome goes into battle with Mr Mxyzptlk
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
Reddit wipes clean leaked celeb nudie pics, tells users to zip it
Now we've had all THAT TRAFFIC, we 'deplore' this theft
Enigmail PGP plugin forgets to encrypt mail sent as blind copies
User now 'waiting for the bad guys come and get me with their water-boards'
YouTube, Amazon and Yahoo! caught in malvertising mess
Cisco says 'Kyle and Stan' attack is spreading through compromised ad networks
TorrentLocker unpicked: Crypto coding shocker defeats extortionists
Lousy XOR opens door into which victims can shove a foot
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.