Feeds

EMC doubles up mainframe VTL capacity, throughput

Still lags behind IBM though

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

EMC has doubled the capacity and throughput of its mainframe virtual tape library (VTL) but it still lags behind IBM. It does exceed Sun's VTL capacity, though.

The EMC DLm (Disk Library for mainframes) now supports up to 1.2PB of raw and usable capacity. EMC says that's almost 3PB compressed capacity, and 1.2GB/sec throughput, by using up to six so-called virtualisation engines. A fully configured DLm needs 13 cabinets.

Sun's VTL PLus 2.0 offers up to 896TB of raw capacity and a 2.4GB/sec throughput on five 19-inch racks. IBM's TS7530 Virtualisation Engine offers 1.7PB raw usable capacity; 3.4PB with 2:1 compression, and up to 4.7GB/sec read bandwidth and 4.4GB/sec write bandwidth.

EMC has improved the DLm's software by adding enhanced administrator support with Secure Remote Services. EMC's Customer Service can directly connect to a customer’s DLm system through a secure IP connection for faster support. Customers can also send off log files, alerts and activities to the EMC support centre for quicker problem resolution. That seems pretty basic, and also pretty necessary. What happened before? Did an EMC support person have to visit the customer's data centre to get this stuff?

EMC says the latest version of DLm software tracks the status of every tape volume in the system and makes that information available within each system. These logs can be replicated to off-site DLm systems, enabling customers to know which tape volumes are usable for their disaster recovery procedures. EMC claims that: "This feature is unique to the industry, providing a key competitive advantage over other mainframe virtual tape libraries."

There's better reporting too. The new DLm is available immediately but no pricing information was released.

There's no deduplication on these boxes, by the way. Where they are used in a disk-to-disk-to-tape environment that's not surprising. EMC is positioning the DLm as a tape replacement device though, and it also has a dedupe-everywhere strategy. That dedupe tide hasn't washed up onto its mainframe VTL shore yet.

Mainframe VTL competitor Shoden has a deduplicating mainframe VTL. It uses a Data Domain dedupe engine writing to HDS drive arrays.

Maybe EMC's DLm needs a Data Domain push? ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.